Advanced c++?

Hi guys, I’m currently on pace to finish the c++ for financial engineering and python for finance courses before my masters in quantitative finance begins in September. I’ll be taking 5 graduate courses beginning from September and I’ve originally planned to begin the advanced c++ course around mid September as well. But these past weeks I’ve talked to numerous people and friends who are already in the quant industry, and I’m having the impression that completing the c++ for FE and python for finance courses is sufficient enough for the programming section of quant job interviews alongside some leetcode and Book problems practices. The ratio between the skills gained to be a quant and the amount of time ive spent on c++ and python this summer is extremely high, and I’m beginning to think the ratio won’t be that high with the advanced c++ course. To be honest, my ultimate goal and priority is to find a quant related job after I graduate masters, not c++. Should I be taking the advanced c++ during my spare time beginning September, or should I focus on improving my other skills (stochastic, derivatives, etc.), is the c++ for FE and the python course sufficient for beginning a career as a quant?
 
Depends on your career path in my opinion.
If you know that you want to work in a role that involves a lot of C++ say for eg: Quant developer @ HFTs, they "Yes" otherwise, maybe focus equally on all the components i.e. Programming, ML/Stats, Math, not just programming.

With Python for Finance, and QuantNet's C++, you are in a good position to start the program.
 
I agree with @Sudhansh Dua that you should equally focus on other components as I believe the C++ for financial engineering and python for finance would suffice to help you thrive in your MFE program. Starting September, I will advise that you focus squarely on your graduate courses because classes like stochastic processes and derivatives can be very demanding.

Note: Graduate courses are exhaustive, rigorous, and intellectually challenging.

Caveat: Taking five graduate courses in a semester seems like a lot.

I wish you the best.
 
I agree with @Sudhansh Dua that you should equally focus on other components as I believe the C++ for financial engineering and python for finance would suffice to help you thrive in your MFE program. Starting September, I will advise that you focus squarely on your graduate courses because classes like stochastic processes and derivatives can be very demanding.

Note: Graduate courses are exhaustive, rigorous, and intellectually challenging.

Caveat: Taking five graduate courses in a semester seems like a lot.

I wish you the best.
Yea my program requires 15 classes to graduate (Rutgers MQF)... I'm planning to complete in 4 semesters (5, 5, 4, 1) so I can do two interns, one during next summer and one during my final semester where I have 1 course.
 
Yea my program requires 15 classes to graduate (Rutgers MQF)... I'm planning to complete in 4 semesters (5, 5, 4, 1) so I can do two interns, one during next summer and one during my final semester where I have 1 course.
Why not 4,4,4,3? I have interned (30-35 yrs/wk) while taking 4 classes - it is doable. Some even argue taking 4 classes a semester is too much. Grad school isn't about just about attending lectures, doing assignments, and studying for tests. The expectation is that you are exploring the material on your own. 5 courses is WAY too much to explore.
 
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