Am I good enough to get into MFE programs?

ozengnr

New Member
Hi people,

I'm coming from a political science background, graduated from a research university in Europe. Although I studied quantitative aspects of political science, I was by no means as advanced as applied math or physics people. I am, however, good at math, got a 170 quant score (161 verbal 5.0 writing) on GRE, etc. I didn't have the required coursework, and I got Calc I, II, III, Linear Algebra, and Probability courses from a community college in Boston. I also took R, Python, and C++ courses, although I am VERY new to programming (started getting familiar just last year) and I'm only beginner in C++ while familiar with R and Python somewhat.

I personally think that, even though my math background is good, (I mean whose isn't?) I stand a very slim chance on getting accepted to one of these quantitative finance programs. In addition, I'm working in a field totally unrelated to finance. (media production)

I'm thinking of applying to UCLA MFE, Baruch MFE, Boston University MathFin, and a couple other safer choices such as UC Irvine MFin. What are my chances on getting into ANY financial engineering program at all? Should I pursue something else?

Thank you for your help.

Edit: Also working on getting CFA Level 1 this December, which I'm more confident in. My undergrad GPA is 3.7 and my non-degree GPA is 4.0.
 

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
What are my chances on getting into ANY financial engineering program at all?
Pretty strong. The caveat is that the programs admitting you are likely to be the bum MFE programs that just want your cash and don't give a cuss that the piece of paper they award you leads nowhere. If you're talking of reputable programs (top 7 or top 10), then your chances appear slim. They too want your money (the name of the game) but they can afford to be picky and your subsequent career matters to them as their reputation is on the line.
 

ApolloChariot

Active Member
Pretty strong. The caveat is that the programs admitting you are likely to be the bum MFE programs that just want your cash and don't give a cuss that the piece of paper they award you leads nowhere. If you're talking of reputable programs (top 7 or top 10), then your chances appear slim. They too want your money (the name of the game) but they can afford to be picky and your subsequent career matters to them as their reputation is on the line.
Harsh but absolutely true. A shame most people don't tell it like it is.
 
I got Calc I, II, III, Linear Algebra, and Probability courses from a community college in Boston.
I also took R, Python, and C++ courses, although I am VERY new to programming

I'm working in a field totally unrelated to finance. (media production)

I'm thinking of applying to UCLA MFE, Baruch MFE, Boston University MathFin, and a couple other safer choices such as UC Irvine MFin.

What are my chances on getting into ANY financial engineering program at all? Should I pursue something else?

Also working on getting CFA Level 1 this December
"ANY" program: 100% chance.
CFA : Well, you spent the money already. But if you want to be a Quant, do the PRM or FRM instead. They are more focused.
R/Python : Great. Stick with one, you'll get further faster. High skill with one is better than "Hello World" with 10.
- you've probably already noticed, but once you learn one, learning another isn't to difficult.
Unrelated Field : Doesn't matter, the MFE is all the relation you'll need, post-degree; and finance experience isn't needed for admission.
UCLA, etc, etc : Please compare SYLLABI. Any school with a good syllabus is worth it.
 

ozengnr

New Member
"ANY" program: 100% chance.
CFA : Well, you spent the money already. But if you want to be a Quant, do the PRM or FRM instead. They are more focused.
R/Python : Great. Stick with one, you'll get further faster. High skill with one is better than "Hello World" with 10.
- you've probably already noticed, but once you learn one, learning another isn't to difficult.
Unrelated Field : Doesn't matter, the MFE is all the relation you'll need, post-degree; and finance experience isn't needed for admission.
UCLA, etc, etc : Please compare SYLLABI. Any school with a good syllabus is worth it.
Thank you for a very thorough and awesome answer!
 
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