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Applied Statistics and Analytics- too narrow for an UG major?

Hi all
I am currently thinking of getting my bachelors' in Applied Statistics and analytics(south Asian country). The course is fairly quantitative, with courses focusing on Statistics along with Math, Econ, Computing and Finance.
I am interested in pursuing Financial Engineering/Quant Finance for my further education(Masters/PhD), preferably abroad.
Now would you recommend that I go for applied stat & analytics as my undergrad major or go for a more traditional statistics major?
Thanks a lot!
 
Hi all
I am currently thinking of getting my bachelors' in Applied Statistics and analytics(south Asian country). The course is fairly quantitative, with courses focusing on Statistics along with Math, Econ, Computing and Finance.
I am interested in pursuing Financial Engineering/Quant Finance for my further education(Masters/PhD), preferably abroad.
Now would you recommend that I go for applied stat & analytics as my undergrad major or go for a more traditional statistics major?
Thanks a lot!

I am currently studying Applied Math and Stats in graduate school, so I may be able to give some perspective. Can you upload a hyperlink to the program so I can look at some coursework?

In general, undergrad serves as a good basis point for gathering general knowledge. Students who further education use graduate school to narrow their interests and concentrate on specific subjects. I would hesitate to be too specific in undergrad (in case you don't like it), instead, try to get into undergrad research that aligns with your interests. This helps you gain exposure/experience in topics you like and keeps your options open. But again, I would need to see the courses before making that determination.

A lot of applied stats/math builds off of traditional math courses, so you may end up getting a mixture of both.
 
I am currently studying Applied Math and Stats in graduate school, so I may be able to give some perspective. Can you upload a hyperlink to the program so I can look at some coursework?

In general, undergrad serves as a good basis point for gathering general knowledge. Students who further education use graduate school to narrow their interests and concentrate on specific subjects. I would hesitate to be too specific in undergrad (in case you don't like it), instead, try to get into undergrad research that aligns with your interests. This helps you gain exposure/experience in topics you like and keeps your options open. But again, I would need to see the courses before making that determination.

A lot of applied stats/math builds off of traditional math courses, so you may end up getting a mixture of both.
that's great advice!
please find attached below the link to the course structure


thank you so much for your time and consideration!
 
that's great advice!
please find attached below the link to the course structure


thank you so much for your time and consideration!

I would say go for it. This is a pretty interesting course combination that covers a lot of good areas. The big ones are stochastic processes, time series, and the modelling courses. I have not taken a pure economics course, so I cannot speak to that, but seems it will provide a good background of the financial markets.

For applied math, it seems a little light on math. If you have time, I would try to pick up a course in PDEs. This will give you an advantage over others when working on pricing strategies. Also for the CS section, I would try to pick up a course in linear programming. This will help you big time in understanding how to constrain models. All in all, I don't think it is too narrow, sounds cool!
 
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