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Baruch Math Degree CS Minor Question

Hello,

So I have been on a silent quest to relearn math from the ground up. Been studying the proofs behind all the basics from trig/logarithms up through single variable calculus in an effort to go back and get a 2nd degree in math at Baruch (accepted for the fall). I may not finish the degree, and just stop when I learn the maths and avoid the rest of the prereqs.

Aside from the ridiculous requirement of a "cultural studies" (black/asian/etc) class which is essentially worthless for math, I need to select a minor as a degree requirement. My primary thought was a CS minor would be smart, focusing on object oriented programming.

The object oriented programming course description is as follows

This course emphasizes an object-oriented approach to solving computer programming problems. Using these techniques leads to shorter system development life cycles, increased programmer productivity, code reusability, and reduced system maintenance costs. This course provides a thorough, practical knowledge of object-oriented programming methods. Students learn the principles underlying programming using a language such as C++.

This is the first part of a two-semester sequence. No prior knowledge of computer programming is required.

Quick history, I have a degree in finance/accounting and econ minor and know VBA, PHP, Javascript, SQL and some python with VB.NET sprinkled in.

I was hoping to get feedback on the following...

1) General opinions about my plan of action
2) Is the CS Minor smart, does the class description you see above seem apt?
3) I am exempt from Calc I, and Calc II seems to be a bottle neck in terms of prereqs for the rest of the classes, I want to hit the ground running with ONLY maths first (OOP class if I have to), are there any maths to take safely with Calc II (with dep. approval)?
4) Most effective use of the fact I will be at Baruch home to a top tier MFE program. (Networking ability, projects, etc)

Thanks!!
 
1) What is your plan of action after finishing the math degree?
I think it would be stupid to go back to school for 1+ years and not get a degree at the end of it. Your first degree should hopefully be able to count towards the basics of your second degree.

2) Yes do a minor in CS.
3) Diff Eq? Linear Algebra? But you should also consider whether you should take the exemption.
4) Network with the professors of the MFE program, possibly take part in one of their research projects leading to a letter of recommendation.
 

roni

Cornell FE
Yeah, the BA in Math has some ridiculous requirements, but if you already have a degree, you may be exempt from the language requirements or some other useless courses.
And, since you are not going to get the degree, do your minor somewhere else through ePermit.
Baruch's CIS department is just sad (there are only few great professors in the department)...
 
I would recommend you go to a science/engineering school instead like CCNY for Math and Computer Science, if that's what you're looking for, that's the best public college in Manhattan for that sort of thing.

Baruch Math Dept is not really related to MFE math, if that's what you're thinking. It's an Arts School, the MFE program is standalone (although their profs do teach some undergrad courses, i wouldn't call it integrated. ) While they have upper math courses, they are rarely offerred due to lack of interest and teaching resources, and are not integrated with programming pieces, like at engineering schools.

It would be a mistake to do undergrad there as MFE prep, in my opinion. I would do non-degree or a second degree program at something like CCNY (which I did for some time).
 

dstefan

Baruch MFE Director
Baruch Math Dept is not really related to MFE math, if that's what you're thinking. It's an Arts School, the MFE program is standalone (although their profs do teach some undergrad courses, i wouldn't call it integrated. ) While they have upper math courses, they are rarely offerred due to lack of interest and teaching resources, and are not integrated with programming pieces, like at engineering schools.


The MFE Program is offered by the mathematics department. The full-time mebers of the MFE faculty are teaching undergraduate courses at Baruch, many of them advanced math courses with applications to finance.
 
Perhaps things have changed a fair bit from 2009. Can you list which Baruch undergrad courses are taught by MFE faculty? I know 4500 for sure.

To assist the original poster, do you think the Baruch CIS offerings provide enough programming base for the MFE program?

Cheers Dan,

Joel
 

AndrewChang

Baruch MFE Alum
Perhaps things have changed a fair bit from 2009. Can you list which Baruch undergrad courses are taught by MFE faculty? I know 4500 for sure.

To assist the original poster, do you think the Baruch CIS offerings provide enough programming base for the MFE program?

Cheers Dan,

Joel

I am a baruch graduate and I've taken Professor Gatheral who teaches financial mathematics, Professor Howard who teaches both stochastic processes and monte carlo simulations, and I know Professor Kosyigna teaches financial math and probability as well. So there are several professors of the MFE who teach undergraduate classes.

I actually have only taken 2 programming classes at baruch which is MTH 3300 and CIS 4100 which are C++ and the second one is OOP. I don't think the quality of the OOP class is very well done but mth 3300 certainly was well taught (I took professor Wong and I know Professor Pickens does a great job as well). And I guess if you count monte carlo as a programming class, that I took with Professor Howard which I thought was one of the best classes.
 
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