Best book for self-learning C++?

Zeuge

Member
If you have some background in object-oriented programming (i.e. Java), what's the best book(s) for self-learning C++?
 

TobiAkin

Member
Thinking in C++ is very good I believe and the structure is good. Im reading it and find gentler explanations than Deitel's C++.
 

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
What's so great about the Eckel books that people here keep recommending them? Josuttis is fine, with Prata for backup. If you're a newbie to coding, Gaddis will hold your hand.
 

TobiAkin

Member
What's so great about the Eckel books that people here keep recommending them? Josuttis is fine, with Prata for backup. If you're a newbie to coding, Gaddis will hold your hand.
Im reading it and it's good and comprehensive as far as I have reached. What particularly don't you like? I just wonder if anything is wrong with this book.
 

TobiAkin

Member
without reading, what will you program?
That meant that while reading you are only going through what the author supplies and a bit more if you play a bit. But while programming in a sense to come across problems and struggle finding a solution you gain much more understanding since such problem scopes are unlimited in contrast to what author gives in little specification.
 

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
Im reading it and it's good and comprehensive as far as I have reached. What particularly don't you like? I just wonder if anything is wrong with this book.
Nothing is wrong with it, but there are a number of other good books on C++ which hardly get mentioned. Deitel I don't like either. But Prata is good, Gaddis is good, so is Josuttis, so is Koenig and Moos' "Accelerated C++."
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
What's so great about the Eckel books that people here keep recommending them?
I liked his application-oriented approach and not just dry syntax. The initial motivation for a C++ CAD library we built at the time was based on his 1988 book.
 

Polter

Active Member
I recommend "Accelerated C++" -- http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/
(the other ones might go into stuff of "what is a variable" variety, etc. , which is unnecessary if you already know to program in general -- this one introduces you to the "C++" part of C++ programming, not just programming in general, and does it in < 400 pages, actually covering what you need -- isn't C++ simpler than Java ;] /* it's also on a very good level, one of the few books not abusing the using directive -- you know, the ones that start with "using namespace std" and teach you bad habits from the start */).
But, you should get two more: http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite/how-to-learn-cpp.html#faq-28.4
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Then there is a group that has never programmed before. They have then to learn what a variable is etc. etc. and we cannot assume anything. My advice is to learn C first, at least the essential and future-proof syntax of Kernighan&Ritchie. Then the move to C++ is less of a shock :)
 
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