Best book for self-learning C++?

#1
If you have some background in object-oriented programming (i.e. Java), what's the best book(s) for self-learning C++?
 
#4
Thinking in C++ is very good I believe and the structure is good. Im reading it and find gentler explanations than Deitel's C++.
 

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
#11
What's so great about the Eckel books that people here keep recommending them? Josuttis is fine, with Prata for backup. If you're a newbie to coding, Gaddis will hold your hand.
 
#12
What's so great about the Eckel books that people here keep recommending them? Josuttis is fine, with Prata for backup. If you're a newbie to coding, Gaddis will hold your hand.
Im reading it and it's good and comprehensive as far as I have reached. What particularly don't you like? I just wonder if anything is wrong with this book.
 
#14
without reading, what will you program?
That meant that while reading you are only going through what the author supplies and a bit more if you play a bit. But while programming in a sense to come across problems and struggle finding a solution you gain much more understanding since such problem scopes are unlimited in contrast to what author gives in little specification.
 

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
#15
Im reading it and it's good and comprehensive as far as I have reached. What particularly don't you like? I just wonder if anything is wrong with this book.
Nothing is wrong with it, but there are a number of other good books on C++ which hardly get mentioned. Deitel I don't like either. But Prata is good, Gaddis is good, so is Josuttis, so is Koenig and Moos' "Accelerated C++."
 

Polter

Active Member
#19
I recommend "Accelerated C++" -- http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/
(the other ones might go into stuff of "what is a variable" variety, etc. , which is unnecessary if you already know to program in general -- this one introduces you to the "C++" part of C++ programming, not just programming in general, and does it in < 400 pages, actually covering what you need -- isn't C++ simpler than Java ;] /* it's also on a very good level, one of the few books not abusing the using directive -- you know, the ones that start with "using namespace std" and teach you bad habits from the start */).
But, you should get two more: http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite/how-to-learn-cpp.html#faq-28.4
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
#20
Then there is a group that has never programmed before. They have then to learn what a variable is etc. etc. and we cannot assume anything. My advice is to learn C first, at least the essential and future-proof syntax of Kernighan&Ritchie. Then the move to C++ is less of a shock :)
 
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