best C++ beginner book

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
If you have never programmed before, I would not advise C++. It's a bridge too far at this stage.

First an easier language such as VBA, Matlab,..

In fact, language-independent concepts such as variable, memory and compilation are needed.
 
What Prof. Daniel Duffy says is absolutely true.

Go through this post:
No Programming Experience - Forum | Quant Network

However, if you have little less than 3-4 months for your program to begin, then I say go for Absolute C++. Coming across your other posts, I get a feeling that you would have one year before you start with your MFE applications and that you are quite keen on Baruch's MFE. If it so, then I say start with C programming.

Best,
Bharadwaj
 

alain

Older and Wiser
the SICP is one of the best books ever in computer programming but you need to be willing to learn scheme.
 
Honestly, I don't believe it matters what language you start with the concepts are all the same. I had never programed before I got into college. I came from a high school were our highest computer class was MS office. When I went to college I was thrown into C++ right off the back and I some how I manage.

My first book was teach yourself c++ in 21 days.
Amazon.com: Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days (5th Edition) (9780672327117): Jesse Liberty, Bradley L. Jones: Books

obviously you can take longer than 21 days but its a good start.
 

Joy Pathak

Swaptionz
I just picked up this book too (I got trigger happy online last night) :

Amazon.com: Introduction to C++ for Financial Engineers: An Object-Oriented Approach (The Wiley Finance Series) (9780470015384): Daniel J. Duffy: Books

I probably won't get to actually get deep into it for a while as I want to finish the Problem Solving with C++ one first, but it definitely looks interesting. I will post an extended review when I am done with both.

I have his other book also: Amazon.com: Financial Instrument Pricing Using C++ (The Wiley Finance Series) (9780470855096): Daniel J. Duffy: Books
 

alain

Older and Wiser
Dr. Duffy hangs around QN so you might be able to ask him questions directly. The reviews of his books in Amazon are a mixed bag. I don't have any of them but I would probably order the Monte Carlo book.

I do like Joshi's book a lot. In fact, we use it in the OO Programming class in the MFE program at Baruch.

---------- Post added at 10:48 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:46 AM ----------
<off topic>
Honestly, I don't believe it matters what language you start with the concepts are all the same.

I don't agree with this at all. Functional languages help your coding skills tremendously but they are not the popular ones. You will learn the concepts really really well if you start with a functional language. However, they are not as easy to understand (at the beginning) as imperative languages.

BTW, I learned how to code in BASIC when I was 7 years old on a VIC-20. Ah... the old days!!!
 

Joy Pathak

Swaptionz
Dr. Duffy hangs around QN so you might be able to ask him questions directly. The reviews of his books in Amazon are a mixed bag. I don't have any of them but I would probably order the Monte Carlo book.

I do like Joshi's book a lot. In fact, we use it in the OO Programming class in the MFE program at Baruch.

Darn. Have to order Joshi's book too then. I have too many C++ books now.
 

Sanket Patel

i do stuff
I think Lippman's C++ Primer is another good book for a beginner.
 
> I think Lippman's C++ Primer is another good book for a beginner.

This book is terrible - it's badly organized, it jumps from topic to topic, the typeface is terrible, the exercises are scarce and simplistic. It's useless as a textbook and it's useless as a reference.

I have this book (I own several C++ books) and if someone on this forum wants it I'll ship it to you if you cover shipping expenses. It's 3rd edition, it's in pristine condition, but I warned you about the content :)
 
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