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Boston MSMFT Boston MSMFT Review

Hi all, I am looking for an honest review regarding Boston University's Masters of Science in Mathematical Finance and Financial Technology program. Would really appreciate your opinions on how good the program is.
 
I am just about to finish this program and can provide some insight.

It's a three-semester program. My class had about 100 students in it, and we were divided into two cohorts. So the biggest classes were 50 while some were as small as 12 or 13. If you put in some effort during classes and office hours to get to know the professors and TAs, they will get to know you and will be extremely invested in your success.

Everyone takes the same classes in the first semester, which includes a two-week math prep class in August before everything starts for real. After the first semester, you pick one of five concentrations: asset management, fintech, quantitative analytics, risk management, or research which is the PhD track. There are required classes and electives among all concentrations which gives you some flexibility, and there is some overlap in case you want to branch into another area. The classes are a good mix of rigorous theory and application. If you choose one of the non-fintech concentrations, you have the option of adding a fourth semester for a fintech graduate certificate on top of your degree, which is what I am doing. It's a way of taking two concentrations in four semesters. In addition to all of the above, you take a one-credit career class in all three semesters and a summer internship/project after the second semester. The career class helps you with your resume and cover letters, technical and behavioral interviewing, networking, and attendance to local events with industry reps. The internship/project helps you get connected to people in the industry and apply your new knowledge in the real world.

All of that being said, you will only get out of this program what you put into it. A few of the students never attended industry speaker events, rarely paid attention in career class, and didn't take advantage of the various BU resources that were being offered (Bloomberg terminals, the business school library, lots of common study areas, very accessible advisors, professors, and TAs, etc.), and then they complained that BU wasn't doing enough to help them get summer internships. Industry professionals aren't usually going to come looking for you; you have to reach out to them and put yourself out there. And in my opinion, this program gives you all of the tools (along with a good program reputation and network with local firms) to do that.

I was recently hired for a full-time position at a financial software company in the Boston area. Everyone that I interviewed with and who I work with speaks very highly of the program. I actually have three other BU MSMFT alumni on my team, and there are several more throughout the company.

I hope this helps! Let me know if I can provide any more info.
 
I am just about to finish this program and can provide some insight.

It's a three-semester program. My class had about 100 students in it, and we were divided into two cohorts. So the biggest classes were 50 while some were as small as 12 or 13. If you put in some effort during classes and office hours to get to know the professors and TAs, they will get to know you and will be extremely invested in your success.

Everyone takes the same classes in the first semester, which includes a two-week math prep class in August before everything starts for real. After the first semester, you pick one of five concentrations: asset management, fintech, quantitative analytics, risk management, or research which is the PhD track. There are required classes and electives among all concentrations which gives you some flexibility, and there is some overlap in case you want to branch into another area. The classes are a good mix of rigorous theory and application. If you choose one of the non-fintech concentrations, you have the option of adding a fourth semester for a fintech graduate certificate on top of your degree, which is what I am doing. It's a way of taking two concentrations in four semesters. In addition to all of the above, you take a one-credit career class in all three semesters and a summer internship/project after the second semester. The career class helps you with your resume and cover letters, technical and behavioral interviewing, networking, and attendance to local events with industry reps. The internship/project helps you get connected to people in the industry and apply your new knowledge in the real world.

All of that being said, you will only get out of this program what you put into it. A few of the students never attended industry speaker events, rarely paid attention in career class, and didn't take advantage of the various BU resources that were being offered (Bloomberg terminals, the business school library, lots of common study areas, very accessible advisors, professors, and TAs, etc.), and then they complained that BU wasn't doing enough to help them get summer internships. Industry professionals aren't usually going to come looking for you; you have to reach out to them and put yourself out there. And in my opinion, this program gives you all of the tools (along with a good program reputation and network with local firms) to do that.

I was recently hired for a full-time position at a financial software company in the Boston area. Everyone that I interviewed with and who I work with speaks very highly of the program. I actually have three other BU MSMFT alumni on my team, and there are several more throughout the company.

I hope this helps! Let me know if I can provide any more info.
You review is very helpful for me, I just got admission from this program. I want to to ask is there an opportunity to become a teaching assistant or a research assistant during this program? And do I have the chance to select some elective courses from other colleges besides the business school? Thanks a lot!
 
You review is very helpful for me, I just got admission from this program. I want to to ask is there an opportunity to become a teaching assistant or a research assistant during this program? And do I have the chance to select some elective courses from other colleges besides the business school? Thanks a lot!
Hi Zhaiquant - opportunities to work as a TA or RA arise from time to time, but we cannot guarantee this. It is possible to take additional courses (generally one per semester) outside of the MSMFT curriculum in the second semester and beyond, provided that you are making very good progress in the MSMFT courses. Note that these additional courses are not substitutes for the MSMFT courses - you are required to take 4 MSMFT courses every semester. Anton, Exec Director, BU MSMFT.
 
Hi Zhaiquant - opportunities to work as a TA or RA arise from time to time, but we cannot guarantee this. It is possible to take additional courses (generally one per semester) outside of the MSMFT curriculum in the second semester and beyond, provided that you are making very good progress in the MSMFT courses. Note that these additional courses are not substitutes for the MSMFT courses - you are required to take 4 MSMFT courses every semester. Anton, Exec Director, BU MSMFT.
We are hosting an information session for the MSMFT program on Thursday, March 4 at 20:00 EST. Email me at ajt@bu.edu for registration details.
 
Thank you!
Hi Zhaiquant - opportunities to work as a TA or RA arise from time to time, but we cannot guarantee this. It is possible to take additional courses (generally one per semester) outside of the MSMFT curriculum in the second semester and beyond, provided that you are making very good progress in the MSMFT courses. Note that these additional courses are not substitutes for the MSMFT courses - you are required to take 4 MSMFT courses every semester. Anton, Exec Director, BU MSMFT.
 
I am just about to finish this program and can provide some insight.

It's a three-semester program. My class had about 100 students in it, and we were divided into two cohorts. So the biggest classes were 50 while some were as small as 12 or 13. If you put in some effort during classes and office hours to get to know the professors and TAs, they will get to know you and will be extremely invested in your success.

Everyone takes the same classes in the first semester, which includes a two-week math prep class in August before everything starts for real. After the first semester, you pick one of five concentrations: asset management, fintech, quantitative analytics, risk management, or research which is the PhD track. There are required classes and electives among all concentrations which gives you some flexibility, and there is some overlap in case you want to branch into another area. The classes are a good mix of rigorous theory and application. If you choose one of the non-fintech concentrations, you have the option of adding a fourth semester for a fintech graduate certificate on top of your degree, which is what I am doing. It's a way of taking two concentrations in four semesters. In addition to all of the above, you take a one-credit career class in all three semesters and a summer internship/project after the second semester. The career class helps you with your resume and cover letters, technical and behavioral interviewing, networking, and attendance to local events with industry reps. The internship/project helps you get connected to people in the industry and apply your new knowledge in the real world.

All of that being said, you will only get out of this program what you put into it. A few of the students never attended industry speaker events, rarely paid attention in career class, and didn't take advantage of the various BU resources that were being offered (Bloomberg terminals, the business school library, lots of common study areas, very accessible advisors, professors, and TAs, etc.), and then they complained that BU wasn't doing enough to help them get summer internships. Industry professionals aren't usually going to come looking for you; you have to reach out to them and put yourself out there. And in my opinion, this program gives you all of the tools (along with a good program reputation and network with local firms) to do that.

I was recently hired for a full-time position at a financial software company in the Boston area. Everyone that I interviewed with and who I work with speaks very highly of the program. I actually have three other BU MSMFT alumni on my team, and there are several more throughout the company.

I hope this helps! Let me know if I can provide any more info.
Thank you so much, this does help a lot! I have a couple of basic queries,
1. I was looking forward to pursuing the 4-semester program by adding a graduate certificate in FinTech. So when you say that I need to choose a non-fintech concentration to pursue this certificate, does that include Quant Analytics?
2. For a couple of courses, such as Adv Machine Learning/ Adv programming, the curriculum on the website states " (This course is reserved for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Financial Technology.)". According to my knowledge, what I can conclude from this is that the students that choose to pursue the Graduate Certificate are the students who get to choose these electives. I hope I am reaching the correct conclusion here?
These are the few basic doubts I have, and once again thanks a ton for your review! It did help a lot and help me clarify a lot of my other queries.
 
Hi hridaypurohit - there are 5 concentrations within the MSMFT program: Asset Management (AM), FinTech (FT), Quant Analytics (QA), Risk Management (RM) and Research and Analytics (RA - a concentration designed for folks thinking about continuing on to do a PhD). The 4-semester program allows you to complete the FT concentration and any one of the other 4 concentrations. If you complete the 4-semester program, you receive the MSMFT degree and the Grad Certificate in Advanced FinTech (GCAFT). The 3-semester program allows you to complete any one of the 5 concentrations. If you complete the 3-semester program, you receive the MSMFT degree, but not the GCAFT. The courses comprising the FT concentration are also available to folks who already have a Master's degree (in an appropriate discipline) as a one-semester (Spring) certificate program, the GCAFT. I hope this helps! If you have more questions, you can reach me at ajt@bu.edu. Thanks for your interest in the MSMFT program at BU. Anton, Exec Director, MSMFT.
 
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