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    Highly recommended by thousands of MFE students. Covers essential C++ topics with applications to financial engineering.
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C++ Primer vs C++ Primer plus

YankeesR

Well-Known Member
C++
Which one of these books would be a good supplementary read alongside the QuantNet C++ course? Two different authors. In the FAQ from years ago, the C++ primer plus 5th edition was said to be a good book alongside the course, but on the reading list thread, C++ Primer by Lippman is one of the books suggested. From the research I've done, Lippman seems to be more of a computer scientist and Prata has a slightly different style from the more modern approach of teaching c++.
I'm a firm believer in reading multiple books to get a proper understanding of any subject, so I plan to read both eventually (providing they are both recommended) but would want to know which one is best to start with and flows with the set up of the course best. If it helps, I've done some C++ before, enough to know the basics.
Also, if a book that you think is a better recommendation alongside the C++ course, that would be welcomed information as well.
 
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Lyle_C

Active Member
C++
I am not sure if you are including this in your reading list already, since it is an obvious choice. But Introduction to C++ for Financial Engineers by Professor Duffy is a good book, not least because it is by the person who created the course. It really helps to clarify a lot of the concepts you encounter in the videos and lecture notes.
 

MichaelLewis

Well-Known Member
C++
I am not sure if you are including this in your reading list already, since it is an obvious choice. But Introduction to C++ for Financial Engineers by Professor Duffy is a good book, not least because it is by the person who created the course. It really helps to clarify a lot of the concepts you encounter in the videos and lecture notes.
I also use this book for the C++ course and find it very helpful. Most of the chapters have lined up perfectly with the course content. And, it also gives you a good idea how to apply the topics we learn to computation finance as he will provide direct examples (e.g. PayOff classes, etc.)
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
In a sense, the best background is your brain + motivation.
90% is self-contained (I think), listen hard to the videos and do the exercises will bring you a long way. And the very helpful TAs!
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Which one of these books would be a good supplementary read alongside the QuantNet C++ course? Two different authors. In the FAQ from years ago, the C++ primer plus 5th edition was said to be a good book alongside the course, but on the reading list thread, C++ Primer by Lippman is one of the books suggested. From the research I've done, Lippman seems to be more of a computer scientist and Prata has a slightly different style from the more modern approach of teaching c++.
I'm a firm believer in reading multiple books to get a proper understanding of any subject, so I plan to read both eventually (providing they are both recommended) but would want to know which one is best to start with and flows with the set up of the course best. If it helps, I've done some C++ before, enough to know the basics.
Also, if a book that you think is a better recommendation alongside the C++ course, that would be welcomed information as well.
The books are a bit too CS and generic for my taste. Lots of syntax, very little design. No offence, but it's like reading the telephone book.
Just my personal opinion. The best way to learn C++ is to write code, brick-by-brick. And the less copy-and-paste, the better. My videos have 80% of what you need.

Many CS books almost never have worked out concrete cases, just toy widget thingies.
 
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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
The heart of mathematics (and C++, red.) consists of concrete examples and concrete problems. Big general theories are usually afterthoughts based on small but profound insights; the insights themselves come from concrete special cases.”
— Paul Halmos
 

YankeesR

Well-Known Member
C++
The books are a bit too CS and generic for my taste. Lots of syntax, very little design. No offence, but it's like reading the telephone book.
Just my personal opinion. The best way to learn C++ is to write code, brick-by-brick. And the less copy-and-paste, the better.
No offense taken, programming is certainly not my strong suit (although in due time it will be!), that's why I'm inquiring from people like yourself and others who have posted here, who have the information I am looking for as I make decisions on how to best learn C++. I've for awhile been planning to take this course, but life has had a way of interrupting that plan lately. Now I'm just gathering all the information I can and deciding when is best for me to take the course. Currently debating taking it right now (just finished my summer course), while I study for the GRE (test is end of August) or take it during the fall semester since I'm only taking 2 maybe 3 classes next semester. Either way I need to take it and have it completed before November, but that's the tentative plan.
 
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MichaelLewis

Well-Known Member
C++
No offense taken, programming is certainly not my strong suit (although in due time it will be!), that's why I'm inquiring from people like yourself and others who have posted here, who have the information I am looking for as I make decisions on how to best learn C++. I've for awhile been planning to take this course, but life has had a way of getting in the way lately. Now I'm just gathering all the information I can and deciding when is best for me to take the course. Currently debating taking it right now (just finished my summer course), while I study for the GRE (test is end of August) or take it during the fall semester since I'm only taking 2 maybe 3 classes next semester. Either way I need to take it and have it completed before November, but that's the tentative plan.
For what it's worth. I about 75% of the way through the course and have probably learned more during this one course than I would have in an entire year by myself. Also, I doubt any C++ courses you can take in school will have a computation finance component to it, so it's nice to see it in action. I am in a CS program right now and a lot of the time it feels like you learn about building things that have no practical use....(or toy widget thingies as @Daniel Duffy mentioned)...which makes it hard to see what's possible. Also, the TA (@APalley is more helpful than 99.999% of professors I've ever had which is another very good reason to take it.
 
C++ primer plus has more examples than C++ primer. If you are totally new to c++, PLUS is a good start. But PRIMER is the most classic, most specific book that many c++ users and learners consider it as "must read". If you already feel comfortable with c++, PRIMER is one of the books you cannot avoid.
 
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