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Career advice needed

As the title suggests, I'm in dire need of career advice. Currently, I'm a dual major(finance & computer science) at a state school. I previously did an internship at a bulge bracket investment bank in the technology department. I'm fortunate enough to have 3 options after I graduate:

1. Technology position at a bulge bracket investment bank
2. Developer position at a major tech firm in Seattle
3. Quant developer like role at an asset management firm(AUM just less than 2 billion) in the southeast.

I think I want to be a quant or trader one day, but I don't know which offer would look better on a resume. Please help!

If anyone needs details I will message them to you but I don't feel comfortable posting everything on the internet.

Update: I took the job at the asset management firm, because I want to be in finance. However, I feel it's important to tell people who are looking for at careers in finance for the money, that I would've definitely made more money as a pure developer at a big technology firm with a lot less stress. Take it from someone who has an undergrad from a non target school and only a 3.6ish GPA, that side by side tech pays better than finance coming out of college.
 
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GoIllini

Market Crises= Gray Hair
I honestly think that a career in tech has better long-term prospects than a career in finance. I think the Seattle firm gives you the best long-term options here.

The technology position at a BB, unless it's guaranteed to be a quant developer role, will be difficult to get into a front office role.

The quant developer role at the AM firm *might* be the way to go if you are dead-set on finance, but it may limit you a bit more than say, a certain firm in Seattle that makes operating systems or another certain firm in Seattle that sells books online, would if you are aiming for a HFT role at a GETCO or GSAM in a few years.

Unless you hate tech and love finance, I say take the offer at the Seattle tech firm and take some challenging math and stats courses. But in all three situations, you will still primarily be a coder in your first job.
 
I honestly think that a career in tech has better long-term prospects than a career in finance. I think the Seattle firm gives you the best long-term options here.

The technology position at a BB, unless it's guaranteed to be a quant developer role, will be difficult to get into a front office role.

The quant developer role at the AM firm *might* be the way to go if you are dead-set on finance, but it may limit you a bit more than say, a certain firm in Seattle that makes operating systems or another certain firm in Seattle that sells books online, would if you are aiming for a HFT role at a GETCO or GSAM in a few years.

Unless you hate tech and love finance, I say take the offer at the Seattle tech firm and take some challenging math and stats courses. But in all three situations, you will still primarily be a coder in your first job.

I am pretty set on finance for better or worse.
Thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it.
 
The high-tech start-up scene in Seattle is getting better and better. Something to think about. Taking that gig could lead to a big break. Just my humble two cents.
 
Hi Anony,

Just to be realistic, being a quant at any sell-side shop has very limited upside and most insiders at banks will tell you the technology staff may or may not be treated very well. So the Asset Management firm sounds more interest, plus $2bn AUM is not bad, depending on the circumstances. The only problem is, that there may not be much going on in your part of the country (I grew up in TX), and being in New York provides huge advantages in terms of career advancement opportunities; simply because if you don't like where you are or what you're paid, you can try to go work across the street.

Still, I would agree with the earlier responses to this thread, if you really want to be a quant for life (because you like the rigid mathematical aspect, because you like to have time to think and allow concepts to marinade, etc.), you don't have to limit yourself to finance. Speaking of which, I have heard from a few friends in Silicon Valley that it is in fact very hard to find good programmers (sorry I know you said you were set on finance). When you step into financial markets, you want to be in the risk taking game, not in the coding game. So don't give up on pushing to move into the front office if you take a role at a financial firm. Just think in the end of the day, you will be happier in the front office in whichever field you choose, either as a PM or trader in finance or as a developer at a tech start-up.

Hope it helps.
 
Thanks this post helped a lot. You are definitely correct about the lack of other opportunities in the area of the asset management firm. One crucial piece of information I left out is that I'm currently interning for the asset management firm and I really like it. I left it out because I think I am biased towards that firm when I'm not sure whether I would like working at the tech firm. Anyways I will update everyone in a few weeks with my decision.

Also, really cool blog C.Y..
 
The answer to your question really would depend on your long term goals overall. You will want to focus on those jobs that will provide you with the best skills and experience overall. As you move along, if you are making career choices based on your long term plan, your resume will most likely reflect the necessary information for the next step along your journey. Which jobs will provide you the most experience with the skills that you are currently weak with? This is another approach as well. Go with the job that will give you the experience you need to improve upon your weaknesses.
 
Quick update. I took the job with the asset management firm and I should be getting into some research. Thanks for everyone's help.
 
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