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Cornell University Eyes NYC Engineering campus

Cornell University will draft a proposal to build a science and engineering campus in New York City, the university announced Tuesday.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday he would seek final proposals for the project from interested universities by Oct. 28. Cornell then announced it would draft a proposal. In the proposal, Cornell will outline the details of its plan for the campus.

Cornell's current presence in New York City includes the Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University Cooperative Extension, a regional office of Cornell's ILR School, Cornell Financial Engineering Manhattan of Wall Street, Cornell-sponsored Food and Finance High School and various other programs ranging from architecture to human ecology, according to the university.

So far, 18 expressions of interest have been submitted by 27 universities. Stanford University, Columbia University, the University of Chicago and schools from Finland, India, South Korea and Israel have also expressed interest.

The winner will be announced in December. For more information visit cornell.edu/nyc.

http://www.theithacajournal.com/article/20110724/NEWS01/107240343/1124/
 
Cornell University will draft a proposal to build a science and engineering campus in New York City, the university announced Tuesday.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday he would seek final proposals for the project from interested universities by Oct. 28. Cornell then announced it would draft a proposal. In the proposal, Cornell will outline the details of its plan for the campus.

Cornell's current presence in New York City includes the Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University Cooperative Extension, a regional office of Cornell's ILR School, Cornell Financial Engineering Manhattan of Wall Street, Cornell-sponsored Food and Finance High School and various other programs ranging from architecture to human ecology, according to the university.

So far, 18 expressions of interest have been submitted by 27 universities. Stanford University, Columbia University, the University of Chicago and schools from Finland, India, South Korea and Israel have also expressed interest.

The winner will be announced in December. For more information visit cornell.edu/nyc.

http://www.theithacajournal.com/article/20110724/NEWS01/107240343/1124/
Bloomberg wants NYC to overtake Silicon Valley as a tech hub for businesses, investors, and entreprenaurs. Quite ambitious. I think Stanford would be the better choice Stanford is also a vying for the offer. It's nearly free real estate up for grabs for a university.
http://cornellsun.com/section/news/...sifies-effort-win-nyc-tech-campus-competition
 
I'm interested to hear why you think Stanford is a better chance than Cornell?
Overall, I think this could be something big for NYC. It depends way too much on the financial sector as the engine of the city. Bringing high tech industry to the city would be a win-win for everyone.

Now, students the world over can come to the big Apple to work on Wall Street or high tech firms.
 
I'm interested to hear why you think Stanford is a better chance than Cornell?
Overall, I think this could be something big for NYC. It depends way too much on the financial sector as the engine of the city. Bringing high tech industry to the city would be a win-win for everyone.

Now, students the world over can come to the big Apple to work on Wall Street or high tech firms.
Only because Stanford is a better engineering school and is a big part of Silicon Valley. Bringing Stanford to NYC would attract Silicon Valley investors to NYC. But either school would be great for NYC.
 
hmm. I can't agree that Stanford has a better Engineering than Stanford. Both were formed around the turn of the 20th century with money from rich individuals.

Stanford has a stronger CS dept and very strong medical and biological sciences faculty. Cornell has a hotel school. Both school are strong in hard sciences. In all, I would say for Mech Eng Cornell is stronger. It is moot. They are both famous schools with famous names. Yes Stanford's huge endowment makes it appear more prestigious. Cornell is Ivy league. Stanford is not. The argument goes on and on.

Whichever wins it will be great for NY. I personally think they might go for Stanford since they are trying to create another Silicon Valley. But then again, Cornell being a local state champion of New York state, might just pip Stanford.

Stanford is already rich. Spread the wealth to Cornell O mayor of NYC.
 

koupparis

Carpe noctum
Stanford makes more sense from a business perspective. Deciding which is a better Eng school Cornell or Stanford is really splitting hairs. Both are high caliber schools. Cornell already has a big presence in the city, Stanford does not. Stanford may entice some entrepreneurs from the west coast, while Cornell lacks that ability. I hope they go with Stanford, Cornell already has a good footing in the city and may find other ways of bringing down an engineering presence.
 
There is available space on Roosevelt Island, which the city is providing.

I see an issue regarding transportation, if many students and faculty will be traveling to and from the campus on a daily basis (i.e., if they are not residing on the island, in either the existing apartments or in future residential construction.)

This map shows the island layout:

http://www.rioc.com/transportation.htm

http://www.rioc.com/images/rimap122106.gif

Although the map is not labeled, "North" is to the right. The proposed Cornell campus would be on the left (South) side of the island, not far from the tram station, and a bit farther from the lone subway station (F).

The only connection presently available for cars and buses is the 36th Avenue bridge which connects Roosevelt Island to Long Island City, Queens. This bridge leads into the residential section located at the center of the island.

The tram (resembling a pair of large ski gondolas) travels from Roosevelt Island to 2nd Avenue and 60th Street in Manhattan. http://www.rioc.com/images/trams.jpg

The subway's first stop in Manhattan is at 63rd and Lexington, with subsequent stops along 6th Avenue, e.g., 57th Street, 50th Street, 42nd Street, etc.
Also the subway travels to Queens, where it runs beneath Queens Boulevard.

At present there is no bridge connecting the island with Manhattan. (Although the Queensboro Bridge passes above Roosevelt Island, it connects Queens with Manhattan, and uses Roosevelt Island just to support its central pillars. The roadway is built at far too high an elevation for vehicles to be able to descend to Roosevelt Island from this bridge.)

The concern is whether the existing transportation facilities would be sufficient to handle the influx of students, faculty, and staff, or whether additional facilities would be required.
Note that Cornell's main presence in Manhattan at present -- the Cornell University Medical College at New York Hospital -- is located just across the river between E.68th street and E.72nd street. This is where Cornell students pursue the M.D. degree, as well as graduate degrees in the biomedical sciences.

Perhaps some sort of ferryboat system connecting the existing Cornell facilities with the new campus might be a feasibility, especially if there would be frequent collaboration between people at each facility.
 
I assume that it would be logical for Cornell to later have its financial engineering program based in NYC?
 
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