Demand for C++ Developers?

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
especially in the current time when there is a flood of "watered down" programmers who only know python and r
I don't want to go on a rant but as an ancient veteran of computing (I feel like I'm 25) it is an attention point for organisations to avoid a potentially impending Ball of Mud. (disclaimer: I use C++, C# and Python).

I am deadly serious. Been in the wars.

 
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Liam

Active Member
especially in the current time when there is a flood of "watered down" programmers who only know python and r
Sums it up best. Even then I wouldn't say having python or R to any decent standard is a bad thing. I volunteer for a Meetup programming group and get to see the standard of said flood and would say that, although standard amongst CS/math/data science students is good, most "coders" we see struggle with basic if statements when they have to move beyond codecademy tutorials and where they have to put something useful together. And in many cases they have done "courses" in programming.

OP, look up any website that details companies' stacks and I cannot find any language that isn't used. You always hear these reports that blah blah isn't used anymore when in reality, even in lean times, if you are good with a language and especially the domain it is used, the demand will be there somewhere. The domain is important e.g. if you use C++ for graphics where you would use maths and knowledge of graphics or design, then to gain longevity in your career you need to understand how to efficiently convert your knowledge of maths and graphics into a commercial product, while being able to communicate your progress to business people.
 
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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Some myths about programming skills etc.

1. I am an applied mathematician, thus I am automatically a good programmer.
2. Programming is easy, it demands little cognitive effort.
3. No need to write maintainable code, our CS prof never talks about that.

The misconceptions abound. When you enter an industrial setting, reality kicks in.
 

oxboz

New Member
Some myths about programming skills etc.

1. I am an applied mathematician, thus I am automatically a good programmer.
2. Programming is easy, it demands little cognitive effort.
3. No need to write maintainable code, our CS prof never talks about that.

The misconceptions abound. When you enter an industrial setting, reality kicks in.
Wonder how to demonstrate the programming skills for those who do not have an advanced degree. Is Github the best way?
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Try HackerRank.com
The name says it all..

From their site

HackerRank is a technology hiring platform that is the standard for assessing developer skills for over 1,000 companies around the world. By enabling tech recruiters and hiring managers to objectively evaluate talent at every stage of the recruiting process, HackerRank helps companies hire skilled developers and innovate faster.

P.S. it would be interesting to know what process is use to determine what developer skills are.
 
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UuxjKAMlqI

Member
C++ Student
Thank you for the informative replies Daniel Duffy, IntoDarkness, Liam, and James Ma. I have heard elsewhere the opinion that Python has caused less supply of skilled C++ programmers relative to the entire labor pool, while skill in C++ remains in demand. It seems, then, a prudent option at this time for one seeking a career in quantitative finance to become proficient in C++.
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Thank you for the informative replies Daniel Duffy, IntoDarkness, Liam, and James Ma. I have heard elsewhere the opinion that Python has caused less supply of skilled C++ programmers relative to the entire labor pool, while skill in C++ remains in demand. It seems, then, a prudent option at this time for one seeking a career in quantitative finance to become proficient in C++.
You're welcome,
Good plan. Not only the demand but the programming *discipline* that C++ demands. After that all other languages become easy to learn.
 

ExSan

Active Member
You're welcome,
Good plan. Not only the demand but the programming *discipline* that C++ demands. After that all other languages become easy to learn.
Exactly!
"After that all other languages become easy to learn."
Python becomes almost a piece of cake, unless you try to implement complex data structure like RB-Tree
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Exactly!
"After that all other languages become easy to learn."
Python becomes almost a piece of cake, unless you try to implement complex data structure like RB-Tree
Python was not built for RB trees. A hedge-clipper is not a chainsaw :D
The right tool for the right job. Python is a scripting language.
 
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quantsmodelsbottles

Active Member
would you say this applies for research/data science roles as well? or would the time be better spent learning how to pass through the rounds of difficult interviews..
 
That is a good question, how to better spend time when you look for a job. Should more time be spent on studying interview related questions or your own interests? It's a dilemma for me.
would you say this applies for research/data science roles as well? or would the time be better spent learning how to pass through the rounds of difficult interviews..
 
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IntoDarkness

Active Member
if you already have the domain knowledge of the frequently interviewed subjects from college studies, passing interview shouldn't be that hard
 
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