Does my Bachelor's have enough mathematics?

https://www.bitmesra.ac.in/Courses/...d923eb534e07f32b2_IMQEDS_Course_Structure.pdf
This is the course structure for my bachelor's degree in India.
So when I saw the entry requirements for MSc Maths and Finance at Imperial it says mathematics courses in bachelor's are must but doesn't mention what all topics like Baruch do. So can anyone please check the course structure and tell if it has enough mathematics courses to satisfy Imperial's needs. Just check the undergraduate part(semesters 1-6).
 
This is too soft.
I have the list of books they want the freshers to read as pre-courses. What if I read those books and mention it in my personal statement? They can then test my knowledge during the interview? Is there any alternative way I can overcome this?

I wanted to take the pre-MFE courses from Baruch but the cost is far too much. Same reason why I couldn't take your C++ course. Please help me finding alternative ways I can remove this barrier. I really don't want money to hinder my career. I am in my first year so I have 3 years time. I'm sure there must be some way.
 
No, it doesn't.
I have the list of books they want the freshers to read as pre-courses. What if I read those books and mention it in my personal statement? They can then test my knowledge during the interview? Is there any alternative way I can overcome this?

I wanted to take the pre-MFE courses from Baruch but the cost is far too much. Please help me finding alternative ways I can remove this barrier. I really don't want money to hinder my career. I am in my first year so I have 3 years time. I'm sure there must be some way.
 
https://www.bitmesra.ac.in/Courses/...d923eb534e07f32b2_IMQEDS_Course_Structure.pdf
This is the course structure for my bachelor's degree in India.
So when I saw the entry requirements for MSc Maths and Finance at Imperial it says mathematics courses in bachelor's are must but doesn't mention what all topics like Baruch do. So can anyone please check the course structure and tell if it has enough mathematics courses to satisfy Imperial's needs. Just check the undergraduate part(semesters 1-6).
More math courses than most engineering majors in India. So go for it!
Usually Baruch only considers the course iff you get a grade above B if I am not wrong, which means the grades will be considered.
 
More math courses than most engineering majors in India. So go for it!
Usually Baruch only considers the course iff you get a grade above B if I am not wrong, which means the grades will be considered.
Yes, I have that in mind. I am aiming to get a Hons degree so for that I need a 9+ CGPA.
You seem to be Indian so if you know of good mathematics courses that I can do along with my college in India please let me know. I may afford those.
The Baruch pre-courses may be the best but they cost over 1 lac each which is far too much for me. I have attached the list of books that Imperial demands. @Daniel Duffy @Hasek
 

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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
The book by Rudin is severely outdated. I used it at maths undergrad level in 1972. For economics background, it will be a bridge too far. Imperial might be also too ambitious..
 
The book by Rudin is severely outdated. I used it at maths undergrad level in 1972. For economics background, it will be a bridge too far. Imperial might be also too ambitious..
Then what book do you suggest?
Yeah but it's not impossible. I want to do big things in life. I don't think it's wrong to be ambitious. People here are getting CMU and UCB and I also saw acceptances from Princeton and Baruch they are more difficult than Imperial I think. I am sure if I work super hard and take the right guidance I can make it there too.
 
The book by Rudin is severely outdated. I used it at maths undergrad level in 1972. For economics background, it will be a bridge too far. Imperial might be also too ambitious..
It's not just Rudin. There are several other books on the list I don't think should be there. If bozos like this designed the reading list and are in charge of the program, what does it say about the program?
 
It's not for me to say which book. For my courses, I use several.


Nothing wrong with ambition, but legwork is needed. 2-3 years of maths. And have you a gift for maths?
Imperial is top-notch.
Thanks for the resources.
I don't know what do you mean by legwork but it's not like I'm out of mathematics. I have been doing maths for the past 2-3 years for my college entrance exams. 12th grade calculus, algebra and I do have basic idea of binomial, permutations and probability. That's why I think if I build on this knowledge for the next 2-3 years it's possible. It's not like I'll be going next year. I'm a 2026-27 candidate.
I wouldn't say I have a gift for maths but what I have is resilience. It does take me some time understand concepts but I have the patience to stick with it. I don't get bored easily with maths. I can grind on a difficult calculus problem for 5-6hrs straight. Last year in the month of August I was solving calculus problems for 8-9hrs a day for a month. Isn't this dedication any worth?
I couldn't land into an IIT because chemistry was unbearable for me. Yes Imperial is top notch and that's why I started out 3 years early.
I think one thing you have got wrong about me is economics background. As I said I'm just in my first year so I don't really have a background yet and that's why I think I can do these stuff. As for programming I can say I have gift in this case. I have a decent knowledge in JAVA from my school course so C++ wouldn't take more than 3-4 months. I will be following the syllabus from your course so as to have a financial angle to it.
 
Then what book do you suggest?
Yeah but it's not impossible. I want to do big things in life. I don't think it's wrong to be ambitious. People here are getting CMU and UCB and I also saw acceptances from Princeton and Baruch they are more difficult than Imperial I think. I am sure if I work super hard and take the right guidance I can make it there too.

If you are ambitious, put some effort into finding out what books there are on real analysis, and which one/s would suit you. Don't expect to be spoon-fed.
 
The program has good statistics. Average placement is of 109K according Risk.net
Also Imperial is the target I want but it's not the only program I'm looking at.
I have shortlisted these
Imperial MFin
Imperial RMFE
ETH Zurich MQF
Baruch MFE( very tough I know)
LSE MFin
I am also researching about Paris-Sorbonne Prob and stat( If you have details please share) and Oxford MCF
Suggestions are welcomed( please keep it to Europe only).
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
It's not just Rudin. There are several other books on the list I don't think should be there. If bozos like this designed the reading list and are in charge of the program, what does it say about the program?
The list is a bit of a disjointed hotch-potch TBH.

Some of the books have a cargo cult feel (e.g. Lewis).
IMHO is was not quants who caused the crash. It was coming from 2006 (in fact) but no one was interested in knowing. So why have a book reference?

S. Patterson:The Quants, the maths geniuses who brought down Wall Street (Princeton University Press, 2014): history of the largest quantitative hedge funds from their creations to the 2007-2008 crisis.
 
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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
The program has good statistics. Average placement is of 109K according Risk.net
Also Imperial is the target I want but it's not the only program I'm looking at.
I have shortlisted these
Imperial MFin
Imperial RMFE
ETH Zurich MQF
Baruch MFE( very tough I know)
LSE MFin
I am also researching about Paris-Sorbonne Prob and stat( If you have details please share) and Oxford MCF
Suggestions are welcomed( please keep it to Europe only).
Baruch is in NYC, not Euroope, right??
 
The list is a bit of a disjointed hotch-potch TBH.

Some of the books have a cargo cult feel (e.g. Lewis).
IMHO is was not quants who caused the crash. It was coming from 2006 (in fact) but no one was interested in knowing. So why have a book reference?

S. Patterson:The Quants, the maths geniuses who brought down Wall Street (Princeton University Press, 2014): history of the largest quantitative hedge funds from their creations to the 2007-2008 crisis.
Yes, I got this info from the movie the Big Short. I don't know how accurate it is but it is one of the first places where I came across the term "quant". People probably think it was the quants' mistake because ig some quants made good money from the crash.
But I have one question. On Quora, people say that the demand for Quants has reduced, and their compensations have reduced after 2008 but by logic, it should have increased right? Although the US labor statistics say by 2030 the demand for Financial engineers will grow by 6%.
 
People who write on Quora have nothing else to do, don’t listen to them.

Just try to be the best at what you do, and you’ll have a job or maybe who knows your own hedge fund.
 
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