Chicago MSFM Eligible to apply without a GRE, but should I?

After looking over Chicago's program, I noticed they do not require a GRE if you received you BS by June of 2007. I received my BS of Math in May of 2007, so I meet this deadline, but does anyone think it would be beneficial to take the GRE anyway?

I'm honestly unsure of how many programs I will apply to. I am finishing my JD this year and the economy is completely atrocious for any lawyer who didn't attend one of the t14 schools (I am just outside of this, above median, and still scrambling for anything). After reviewing all of the variously named financial mathematics masters programs, I feel as though the JD may be beneficial in the end when paired with this degree. But I would rather not subject myself to the GRE if I really don't have to, but I'm unsure as to whether or not this will hurt my application. For reference, I received a 3.69 gpa in undergrad (USoCarolina) and I'll graduate with something around a 3.7 from law school (OhioState).

The obvious benefit to taking the GRE is that I can apply to a huge number of schools. Honestly, I have no idea what is even on the GRE since I've only take the SAT, LSAT, and FSOT exams in my lifetime and thought the GRE was for liberal arts type grad schools, not real (i.e. science) programs.
 

GoIllini

Market Crises= Gray Hair
You have a strong background in math, but an 800 (Q) on the GRE might help confirm Chicago's expectation of a strong quantitative ability. Unfortunately, it may be too late to take the GRE II Subject test.

The GRE quant section just tests the same kind of algebra, geometry, and logic as the SAT and the Verbal section looks a lot like the SAT Verbal you took. One of the differences may be data sufficiency on the quant section. If you're a math major and study the quantitative section for two weeks, you should be able to get a 790 or 800. If you don't get at least a 780 or 790 on the math section, I'm not sure the GRE will help your application.
 
How beneficial would taking the GRE II section be? I had thought simply taking the GRE would be sufficient for the schools that require it, and the GRE II score was essentially a bonus you could add to your application.

Also, if it helps with recommending whether or not I should take the test, I did take Real Analysis (B), Abstract Algebra (A), ODE (A), PDE (A), Calc I-III (A,B,A), Fin. Math (A), Discrete Optimization (A), Discrete Math (B), Linear Algebra (B), Probability I and II (A, B+), and Topology (C+....sigh). So I should have a solid math background according to my transcript, but maybe the GRE would go a long way to making up for the lack of financial career experience (I went from Ugrad straight to Law School).
 

GoIllini

Market Crises= Gray Hair
The GRE that you mentioned Chicago does not require for 2007 graduates refers to the GRE Math subject. You still need to take the General GRE which is required by virtually every program.

The website seems to be giving out two different pieces of information. Here is what they say at the following link:
http://finmath.uchicago.edu/new/msfm/prospective/plan_admission.php
Both the GRE General Test and the GRE Math Subject Tests are required. However, if you received your bachelor's degree prior to June of 2007, you are exempt from any GRE requirements.

Please consult the GRE website for testing dates, and select dates which will provide results in time for application review. Link to ETS website for GRE testing information.


Chad- You may want to call them up about this.

---------- Post added at 10:23 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:55 AM ----------

How beneficial would taking the GRE II section be? I had thought simply taking the GRE would be sufficient for the schools that require it, and the GRE II score was essentially a bonus you could add to your application.

Also, if it helps with recommending whether or not I should take the test, I did take Real Analysis (B), Abstract Algebra (A), ODE (A), PDE (A), Calc I-III (A,B,A), Fin. Math (A), Discrete Optimization (A), Discrete Math (B), Linear Algebra (B), Probability I and II (A, B+), and Topology (C+....sigh). So I should have a solid math background according to my transcript, but maybe the GRE would go a long way to making up for the lack of financial career experience (I went from Ugrad straight to Law School).

--These are the less-qualified views of a Financial Programmer (not a quant) who evaluates CS majors, Math majors, and Computer Engineers for employment at an investment bank and knows a few people who are in or have graduated from financial engineering programs. I have never sat on an admissions committee and I don't hire quants.--

I'd like to think that the C+ in topology shouldn't be a disqualifier or even that harmful, especially if S. Carolina's math program is typical of other state school math programs where the courses have low grade inflation. Most good students will get at least one or two below-average grades during college. AFAIK, topology is not a prerequisite for financial engineering. At Harvard, a below-average grade would be a B+. Thankfully, at most state schools' engineering, math and hard science programs, a grade isn't really below average until it's a C+ or maybe a B- if they have more grade inflation.

If the Bs in Linear Algebra, Calc II, and Probability II mean above average, they probably won't hurt you either. In fact, I know a guy who was accepted at Princeton's financial engineering program with basically the same Bs that you had, but a weaker math background because he was an engineer.

Even if the website is ambiguous about whether it's required, you should really think about taking the GRE general test. Most of your competition will either have a GRE score and strong recs from math or finance professors or have a few years of industry experience. Your JD certainly gives you a unique background, but I think a GRE would make it easier for them to compare you with other people they are admitting straight out of school.
 
Yea that is exactly the piece of information that I was referencing, and I will call them to clarify. I think it may be a bit too late to take the GRE since I would need to take the Feb. exam and those results aren't out until the middle of March.

I plan on speaking with one of my professors to gauge how this degree will complement my JD; and I may end up applying to UC for next year without taking the GRE just to see if I'm accepted. If not, I plan on taking the GRE anyway, which opens up all of the other schools anyway and bumps my application by virtue of the score (assuming I perform well on it).

I appreciate all of the information you both have provided, thanks for taking the time to help.
 
The GRE that you mentioned Chicago does not require for 2007 graduates refers to the GRE Math subject. You still need to take the General GRE which is required by virtually every program.

That's very true. I emailed them about it before.
 
const 451,

I have a very different info. I got an email from terri a couple months ago saying that:

"If you received your bachelor's degree earlier than June 2007, you are exempt from GRE requirements."

requirement"S"....meaning both exams... the same as stated on the website.

Who sent you that email?
 
const 451,

I have a very different info. I got an email from terri a couple months ago saying that:

"If you received your bachelor's degree earlier than June 2007, you are exempt from GRE requirements."

requirement"S"....meaning both exams... the same as stated on the website.

Who sent you that email?

I sent out an email to Ashley Doss, who now runs the program in Terri's stead, and got this reply...

Yes, you are exempt from all GRE requirements (general test and math subject test) if you received a Bachelors degree prior to June 2007.
 
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