Florida not a target school

DMD

Active Member
Is there a definitive list of target schools? Would you mind posting it? I'm curious.
 

DominiConnor

Quant Headhunter
Sadly, I am under an implied obligation not to publish such a list, however I am at liberty to talk of schools to avoid...
 
Yes this is so so sad. My sister attends UF and we were all shocked to read this. I don't know if April fool's is still going on but I can not imagine that a University at this level and with such a population will get away with this one.

Extremely ridiculous, I don't see any logic here whatsoever.
 

DominiConnor

Quant Headhunter
Having taught logic, and studied economics I see it as perfectly logical.
The economic topic most relevant is agency theory, studying they way employees maximise their utility according to their perception of the incentives in their employment.

The people who run the former "University" of Florida know that the people who they need to keep sweet care more about football, running and covering up coaches feeding drugs to young athletes than about any given academic subject.
Thus they will get a bit of whining, but not from anyone they need to care about, indeed you don't get to head a large university (even one as faint as Florida) without the political skills to spin this decision as "strong" and "necessary".

Entirely logical, captain.
 
The University functions as a Research Institution. How can cutting a top research program be anything but debilitating? The school has a sizable endowment, the CS students are extremely capable and UF is known as an Engineering school.

I guess CS is just one unfortunate step outside of the engineering safe haven? I need to read into this more but I can not imagine that CS research at UF has not aided considerably to financing itself.
 
I'm a Florida undergrad student and trust me the student body is pretty upset over this, we tried protesting but obviously it had no effect.
 

Yike Lu

Finder of biased coins.
The economic topic most relevant is agency theory, studying they way employees maximise their utility according to their perception of the incentives in their employment.
Short-sighted agency. The alumni pay the bills, so the admin perceives that the current alumni values athletics far more than CS. However, in the long view, the current students who are getting shafted will be paying (or I suppose NOT paying) future bills as alumni.

Mortgaging the future much?
 

Yike Lu

Finder of biased coins.
Reading some of the comments on the above sites by people more knowledgeable, I'll back off on blaming prioritizing athletics. Still a ridiculous move.
 
Funny thing is that it eliminates one of the last arguments against paying student athletes: that the athletic department brings in money to pay for the academics; that paying athletes their market value takes money away from students. While I'm saddened for UF (I actually grew up in Florida so I know a ton of family/friends who went there), I am happy to see the NCAA starting to crumble.
 
The situation is not quite as simple as it appears on the surface.
There is in fact a huge overlap between the CS undergraduate program and the MIS undergraduate program in the Business School. The course material covered tends to be common. CS has a few more courses which are highly theoretical and Mathematics oriented than the MIS program in the Business School. The demand among the undergraduates and the recruiters heavily favored the undergraduate MIS program.
As I mentioned in a previous post a few months ago, the enrollment in undergraduate CS programs in EVERY UNIVERSITY in the USA fell about 50% between 2000 and 2008. In the case of Florida the enrollment in the CS undergraduate program was less than 30% of 2000 enrollment. With such a low undergraduate enrollment, they probably could not sustain the fully funded graduate programs and research. This is probably the reason why they chose to eliminate the CS program.
 
I don't see why you're informing a headhunter about the relevance of your school in quant finance...And the change to the CS department absolutely makes the school look a lot worse.
 

GoIllini

Market Crises= Gray Hair
There are four things that government tends to be uncharacteristically good at- probably even better than the private sector:

1.) The post office.
2.) The military.
3.) National Parks.
4.) STEM programs at large public state schools.

I think a lot of engineers (myself included) are starting to rethink small government libertarianism.

The situation is not quite as simple as it appears on the surface.
There is in fact a huge overlap between the CS undergraduate program and the MIS undergraduate program in the Business School. The course material covered tends to be common. CS has a few more courses which are highly theoretical and Mathematics oriented than the MIS program in the Business School. The demand among the undergraduates and the recruiters heavily favored the undergraduate MIS program.
I don't know how things are at the University of Florida, but at UIUC and most schools, CS is a highly technical engineering degree which requires 20-30 credit hours of mathematics including Calc I,II,III, calculus-based statistics, linear algebra, numerical methods, and differential equations, 10 credit hours of physics, and another 40 credit hours of specifically required CS and ECE courses. MIS requires 3-4 imperative programming courses, Calc I, and a lot of accounting and finance. If CS is taught as an engineering degree at UF, the overlap is probably only for 30 credit hours at most.


As I mentioned in a previous post a few months ago, the enrollment in undergraduate CS programs in EVERY UNIVERSITY in the USA fell about 50% between 2000 and 2008. In the case of Florida the enrollment in the CS undergraduate program was less than 30% of 2000 enrollment. With such a low undergraduate enrollment, they probably could not sustain the fully funded graduate programs and research. This is probably the reason why they chose to eliminate the CS program.
A lot of that had to do with the dot-com crash. At the very least, do what MIT does and roll CS in with Comp. E, but don't eliminate the program.

Engineering and the technical sciences are the forte of large public research institutions. Yes, enrollment nationally in computer science is down, but it is still a top ten major as of last year.
 
Top