How can I up my chances?

I currently live in New York City, and I'd love to go to Baruch

Here are some key facts about me:

Masters
: Part-time in CS, In progress, 4.0 GPA

Undergrad: Top 10 US Uni, studied Economics, 3.5 GPA
I have a bad grade on my transcript, a C in Linear Algebra. Should I take Baruch's Pre-MFE seminar to show them I can actually do linear?

Work experience: 2 years working as a business and data analyst

GRE: 169Q, 169V

Languages: Good at Python; I don't know C++ yet
--
If Baruch is the only school I'm interested in, what are some things you guys recommend I could do to up my chances?
 
I currently live in New York City, and I'd love to go to Baruch

Here are some key facts about me:

Masters
: Part-time in CS, In progress, 4.0 GPA

Undergrad: Top 10 US Uni, studied Economics, 3.5 GPA
I have a bad grade on my transcript, a C in Linear Algebra. Should I take Baruch's Pre-MFE seminar to show them I can actually do linear?

Work experience: 2 years working as a business and data analyst

GRE: 169Q, 169V

Languages: Good at Python; I don't know C++ yet
--
If Baruch is the only school I'm interested in, what are some things you guys recommend I could do to up my chances?
You want another masters degree?
 
I took all of them and am currently in the Tandon MFE program. I can tell you that they are worth it if you don't have a background in finmath yet. And I also have my undergrad in Economics in the US.
 
My current degree is in progress, and I'm interested in a technical job in finance, so I figured an MFE would be a better option for me
Didn't you say your current masters is in CS? That would be a suitable path to quant - job listings are looking for education in STEM fields. Some fields are "better" than others and CS is one of the top ones.

Some may disagree with me, but I don't really see a point in going back for a second masters - sounds like a waste of time and money. Self study some of the topics you are lacking in, prep for interviews, and start networking.
 
Didn't you say your current masters is in CS? That would be a suitable path to quant - job listings are looking for education in STEM fields. Some fields are "better" than others and CS is one of the top ones.

Some may disagree with me, but I don't really see a point in going back for a second masters - sounds like a waste of time and money. Self study some of the topics you are lacking in, prep for interviews, and start networking.

With a CS master one can get a job in quant dev, but almost 0% chance to get a position in quant research which mainly involve developing mathematical models. The skillset is simply different. and MFE is, in my opinion, the quickest way to gain relevant math skills. It would take years of self-study to study that, plus you won't have the network connection, which is almost as important, if not more, as your math skill. Most of the model dev is proprietary, which means you need to know a guy, who will bring you on board where the actual training begins. And Baruch, or any top school, certainly has that kind of network.
 
With a CS master one can get a job in quant dev, but almost 0% chance to get a position in quant research which mainly involve developing mathematical models. The skillset is simply different. and MFE is, in my opinion, the quickest way to gain relevant math skills. It would take years of self-study to study that, plus you won't have the network connection, which is almost as important, if not more, as your math skill. Most of the model dev is proprietary, which means you need to know a guy, who will bring you on board where the actual training begins. And Baruch, or any top school, certainly has that kind of network.
Well yeah - it's quant research. You are picking the most competitive/complex subdomain of quant to make your argument. I also wouldn't be so quick to say that MFE programs would land you in those positions either. A lot of the QR guys I have talked to will stress how preferred doctorates are. IMO if this dude is interested in QR, he should go for a PhD.

Quant work can be more then just QR. A STEM masters can make you a realistic candidate for other quant roles.

I personally would pursue an MFE over a CS if I wanted to pursue a career in quant (for those reasons you mentioned), but my point is: if you have a STEM masters already, you don't need another one.
 
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Well yeah - it's quant research. You are picking the most competitive/complex subdomain of quant to make your argument. I also wouldn't be so quick to say that MFE programs would land you in those positions either. A lot of the QR guys I have talked to will stress how preferred doctorates are. IMO if this dude is interested in QR, he should go for a PhD.

Quant work can be more then just QR. A STEM masters can make you a realistic candidate for other quant roles.

I personally would pursue an MFE over a CS if I wanted to pursue a career in quant (for those reasons you mentioned), but my point is: if you have a STEM masters already, you don't need another one.

I totally agree! I just use QR as an extreme example since the guy didn't specify his goal besides attending Baruch. But the same situation would be for Quant Strat as well. My point is a CS degree may not provide adequate math training, in which case MFE is certainly valuable. Btw, if you're top of your class from top MFE program, and with lady luck on your side, I certainly saw friends who got into QR.
 
With a CS master one can get a job in quant dev, but almost 0% chance to get a position in quant research which mainly involve developing mathematical models. The skillset is simply different. and MFE is, in my opinion, the quickest way to gain relevant math skills. It would take years of self-study to study that, plus you won't have the network connection, which is almost as important, if not more, as your math skill. Most of the model dev is proprietary, which means you need to know a guy, who will bring you on board where the actual training begins. And Baruch, or any top school, certainly has that kind of network.

I don't necessarily agree with this: Cit Sec for example has quite a few CS undergrads in QR. CS is definitely one of the target majors for QR (although yes I met/seen a lot more HYPSM CS undergrads with these roles over CS masters students so I'm not too sure if QR is just as feasible for CS master students too). A surprising number of candidates at Cit Sec/DRW/IMC/Optiver QR superdays don't really have that much quant finance background at all and tbh I probably got asked more coding questions than finance for these roles. I think the importance of MFE is a bit overstated: I personally feel the level of math needed to thrive in a top 5 MFE can easily be picked up by a bright undergrad (Math 55a at Harvard already seems significantly harder than anything taught at a MFE).

I do agree with jarryds that there's not too much value of getting a second STEM masters as I really don't think another expensive masters is the solution here. If you can already land the interview (which I think you should probably be getting through at least some resume screens with a T10 undergrad + CS masters), then imo the best choice of action is what jarryds suggested: grind interview prep/brush up on ur weaknesses.
 
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I don't necessarily agree with this: Cit Sec for example has quite a few CS undergrads in QR. CS is definitely one of the target majors for QR (although yes I met/seen a lot more HYPSM CS undergrads with these roles over CS masters students so I'm not too sure if QR is just as feasible for CS master students too). A surprising number of candidates at Cit Sec/DRW/IMC/Optiver QR superdays don't really have that much quant finance background at all and tbh I probably got asked more coding questions than finance for these roles. I think the importance of MFE is a bit overstated: I personally feel the level of math needed to thrive in a top 5 MFE can easily be picked up by a bright undergrad (Math 55a at Harvard already seems significantly harder than anything taught at a MFE). I do agree with jarryds that there's not too much value of getting a second STEM masters as I really don't think another expensive masters is the solution here.

I'm sure this guy is not a Math or CS undergrad from Havard lol. We should consider his background here, not just any generic one. But you're right, MFE is not a cheap solution, nor is it fail-safe :)
 
I'm sure this guy is not a Math or CS undergrad from Havard lol. We should consider his background here, not just any generic one. But you're right, MFE is not a cheap solution, nor is it fail-safe :)
But he's from a T10 US undergrad already (granted economics is probably not the best degree for quant). I really think he should be getting through some resume screens already and it doesn't sound like he's an international student (the majority of MFE students are international students, and the primary value for us at least was just so they can sponsor CPT for internship and post-grad OPT - concerns that OP should not have)
 
But he's from a T10 US undergrad already (granted economics is probably not the best degree for quant). I really think he should be getting through some resume screens already and it doesn't sound like he's an international student (the majority of MFE students are international students, and the primary value for us at least was just so they can sponsor CPT for internship and post-grad OPT - concerns that OP should not have)

True the value of MFE drops significantly if he's not an international student hh
 
I totally agree! I just use QR as an extreme example since the guy didn't specify his goal besides attending Baruch. But the same situation would be for Quant Strat as well. My point is a CS degree may not provide adequate math training, in which case MFE is certainly valuable. Btw, if you're top of your class from top MFE program, and with lady luck on your side, I certainly saw friends who got into QR.
Fair enough. I avoided CS because I was a little concerned with the lack of math.
 
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