How expensive is MFE/MQF/MAF/MSF

VPoneday

New Member
Hi guys,

just can't believe that there are people out there that are ok with forking out the money for a masters?
Fees (inclusive of living expenses)
1. Purdue is cheapest at "only" 62k
2. Ohio state university 89k
3. UCLA $133k

how do you all get the money? And how do long do you think you need to pay it back? And if you do have $100k lying around why don't you just invest in the stock markets instead of going back to school?

for reference, Singapore fresh graduate wage is $25k. We don't really get bonus over in Singapore (1 month if you're lucky). Our local universities cost around $25k and students spend a few years to pay back student loan. Our bank loan can only lend up to 10 times our salary which is not great enough for any masters in the US
 

VPoneday

New Member
It is 7-8%
get a us cosigner else
Yeah but as an int student I wouldn't know anyone. STEM OPT is 3 years and I'm not confident that I can repay back the loans in 3 years. I mean we all hope for the best like of course we're gonna find high paying jobs after graduation, but I need to plan for the worst. Dont want to default on debt.
 
So in Singapore you would take out 25K in graduate loan to make 25K on graduation, but you won’t take out 62K to make 100K in the US?
 

nothingnew

New Member
1. Where do i get the money?
Family support

2. how long do you think you need to pay it back?
My family does not expect me to pay it back in my life. Personality, I am confident that I can pay it back in 5-10 yrs.

3. If you do have $100k lying around why don't you just invest in the stock markets instead of going back to school?
Education is the best investment.

One more thing, studying abroad is a privilege, not a necessity even for American students who want to study in Europe. I personally agree with @noether-skolem , if you don't think you can pay it back, why did you apply? I have replied to your previous posts, you want to work and stay in the US, that makes sense to me. But OPT and working visa is not the only way nor necessarily the easiest way to immigrate.

Good luck and hope you will receive generous scholarship!
 
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princeofbelair

New Member
Nothing surprising about the tuition you put here, coming from a US student. Personally that is why I would only go to the top mfe programs because of the placement.

1. Personal, family and loan 2. Not sure but I'm not too worried about it even if it was 100% loan 3. I actually want a career in quant finance not just for the money. Even if that wasn't the case, I think it's still worth investing in a degree that'll confidently place you in a good job.
 

VPoneday

New Member
So in Singapore you would take out 25K in graduate loan to make 25K on graduation, but you won’t take out 62K to make 100K in the US?
How do you know I will make 100k in the US? 😂 i mean, employers are gonna undercut me cause if they are smart they will figure out what was the average wage in singapore and just pay me a bit above my last made wages. Cause Singapore is transparent about wages and this info is very easy to find on the internet. And btw I'm not complaining abt the 62k one, I'm referring to the insane $133k one
 

VPoneday

New Member
If you don't think the potential return of the degree is not worth the risk/cost, why did you apply?
I applied to a variety, to see where would I get accepted to. And costs are not always transparent in the website, they only told me AFTER i got accepted.
 

VPoneday

New Member
1. Where do i get the money?
Family support

2. how long do you think you need to pay it back?
My family does not expect me to pay it back in my life. Personality, I am confident that I can pay it back in 5-10 yrs.

3. If you do have $100k lying around why don't you just invest in the stock markets instead of going back to school?
Education is the best investment.

One more thing, studying abroad is a privilege, not a necessity even for American students who want to study in Europe. I personally agree with @noether-skolem , if you don't think you can pay it back, why did you apply? I have replied to your previous posts, you want to work and stay in the US, that makes sense to me. But OPT and working visa is not the only way nor necessarily the easiest way to immigrate.

Good luck and hope you will receive generous scholarship!
It's good that you can depend on your family. On my wages I can eat ramen everyday and not be able to save much. Singapore has compulsory pension and our cost of living is high.
i want to get a masters degree because i'm not able to apply for the jobs that I want based on my credentials now. Apparently GPA is super important in SG even though it's my nth job; and apparently NUS is not really recognized in USA (gets rejected for admin jobs)
 

Onegin

Active Member
C++ Student
It sounds more like you are trying to confirm a decision you’ve already made, rather than actually seeking new information. So, you’re right.

Even if you did go to a top program, you’ve already chosen your excuses and justified yourself in not even trying, because hey, you already know the outcome. So why bother?

If you did give up the excuses, then you’d have the responsibility and risk of figuring out how to make it work. You’re right, there is no guarantee you’d make 100k out of school. But a lot of people do, and many are from countries with a GDP per capita much lower than Singapore.

The path isn’t for everyone. If you have made your decision, then own it and move on.
 

longgamma

Active Member
C++ Student
Have you looked at MS CS align or the professional masters programs ? Not trying to discourage you but Software engineering jobs are way more plentiful and also it’s a transferable set of skills in other countries. Also take a look at data science programs, as many banks are looking to add data scientists to the program. Good luck !
 

VPoneday

New Member
It sounds more like you are trying to confirm a decision you’ve already made, rather than actually seeking new information. So, you’re right.

Even if you did go to a top program, you’ve already chosen your excuses and justified yourself in not even trying, because hey, you already know the outcome. So why bother?

If you did give up the excuses, then you’d have the responsibility and risk of figuring out how to make it work. You’re right, there is no guarantee you’d make 100k out of school. But a lot of people do, and many are from countries with a GDP per capita much lower than Singapore.

The path isn’t for everyone. If you have made your decision, then own it and move on.
I've not really made up my mind. I'm just asking everyone for logical answers.
I just feel that instead of logical answers, everyone tells me "emotionally" that all MFE are so good and the school fees are nothing lol. I mean I get it that everyone is different but it feels rather weird that nobody address the rumours of (salaries being overstated, immigration issues, overrated schools like non-Ivy Leagues). Well, at the end of the day isnt all evil employers the same? They try to underpay you? The $100k salaries everyone talk about is surely the exception and not the norm right? Or are americans so damn rich that $100k tuition fees are nothing and doesn't keep them up at night for months on how they will pay back their student debt. I've read plenty of posts on reddit and other forums to know that's a valid concern. It's not like I can go up to people and be like "be my guarantor because I will earn $100k upon graduation lol". They won't believe me. So if I take a no-cosigner loan, that will mean I'm the only one believing myself and will have the ultimate stress knowing that at any one point if things go wrong (and something will always go wrong, whether it's failing exams or can't find a job), I have no back up options. Nothing.

PS: not sure if you know of any Singaporeans in your course. We're a pretty rare species 😂 and we don't think the same as other "countries with lower GDP lol". That's why I have nobody to turn to but this forum, because like I said already this is a country where few people do a masters degree.
 

longgamma

Active Member
C++ Student
If RoI is so critical, nothing wrong in that btw, then maybe mfe isn’t the best option. As you are limited to financial institutions mostly. Maybe software engineering is a safer bet - atleast you will get a job if you are competent.
 

Seemalb

New Member
I've not really made up my mind. I'm just asking everyone for logical answers.
I just feel that instead of logical answers, everyone tells me "emotionally" that all MFE are so good and the school fees are nothing lol. I mean I get it that everyone is different but it feels rather weird that nobody address the rumours of (salaries being overstated, immigration issues, overrated schools like non-Ivy Leagues). Well, at the end of the day isnt all evil employers the same? They try to underpay you? The $100k salaries everyone talk about is surely the exception and not the norm right? Or are americans so damn rich that $100k tuition fees are nothing and doesn't keep them up at night for months on how they will pay back their student debt. I've read plenty of posts on reddit and other forums to know that's a valid concern. It's not like I can go up to people and be like "be my guarantor because I will earn $100k upon graduation lol". They won't believe me. So if I take a no-cosigner loan, that will mean I'm the only one believing myself and will have the ultimate stress knowing that at any one point if things go wrong (and something will always go wrong, whether it's failing exams or can't find a job), I have no back up options. Nothing.

PS: not sure if you know of any Singaporeans in your course. We're a pretty rare species 😂 and we don't think the same as other "countries with lower GDP lol". That's why I have nobody to turn to but this forum, because like I said already this is a country where few people do a masters degree.
Their are no guarantees, it is you who will have to go to a top school, compete and get a good job.
It isn't as simple as buying a bond and getting a yearly return. Why don't you try online courses, and then try to find a job. It would be extremely tough. A good mfe program will provide you with access to a good network, opt and ensure that you learn something during your course . I agree that they are overpriced but that is just the way it is and will remain in future. Why don't you suggest us guys an easier way to become a quant
 

Prokofiev

New Member
I don’t think anyone here has a secret, magical way to finance their graduate degree. You can use personal or family savings, get a scholarship, take out a loan or do a mix of these. It sounds like your only option is borrowing, but you doubt it’s worth it. That settles the question. If you don’t have the money, you can’t do it. I understand it’s frustrating. However, most individuals can’t afford a graduate degree at a top US institution. That’s just reality.

You’re getting this reaction because you’re addressing a forum for people interested in quantitative finance. We wouldn’t apply for those programs if we thought it was a waste of money.

Have you considered studying in another country than the US? It may be more cost-effective.
 
To be fair I think all of us went through this phase of questioning the worth of the degree relative to the tuition fees, living costs, loans, opportunity costs of leaving our jobs for 1-2 years. @Prokofiev is correct that there's a sample bias here as most of those who decided that an MFE isn't worth it wouldn't be here replying posts.

The problem here seems to be that you can't justify the sacrifices you need to make for the potential returns of the degree. In that case you already have your answer there: don't do it. If you're looking for affirmation from people who have also decided that an MFE isn't worth it, this probably isn't the best place to do so.

I applied to a variety, to see where would I get accepted to. And costs are not always transparent in the website, they only told me AFTER i got accepted.
I don't buy this argument. Numbers are available all over the internet, heck even Quantnet's very own ranking shows past year's tuition fees, adjust for a few % increment and you'll have a decent ballpark figure for this year's fees. You can make an educated guess on living costs as well from searching the internet or asking people (some programs even give you their estimates).

I have a feeling that you've thought about this before applying, and you're just getting second thoughts now that you actually need to take the loan. Nothing wrong with that, really, just that I don't think any of us can help you with that. Think about it yourself and consult your family if necessary.

For what it's worth, your estimated cost for UCLA ($130k) would likely be in the same region as the cost of attending Columbia or NYU Courant in NYC for 1.5y, or Princeton for 2y. Going to CMU should even cost less (cheaper living costs compared to NYC or LA). If you can't justify $130k for UCLA maybe try again next year and aim for the higher ranked schools?
 
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