How is this for a theoretical undergrad schedule?

I've attached a schedule that I made using the UMCP course catalog (University of Maryland Undergraduate Catalog 2010-2011). Successful completion of this schedule would get me 3 majors: Finance, Computer Science, and Mathematics (Statistics Track). I could choose two of those to be separate degrees (i.e BBA and BS) as well.

Of course this is only possible because of my AP Credits and Exemption Exams ;-)

Please tell me if it will prepare me for a Graduate in MFE, and if you have other comments on it, please post them!

Thanks!
 

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Your schedule looks very rigorous. Looks a lot like my college schedule =]

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models In Business, sounds like a business stats class. Is this required? You might be able to swap it with a regression course in the stats department. It's a lot more quantitative.

BTW did you include the grad courses that you are planning on taking? I think you can add some stochastic classes in there. And maybe take numerical analysis a bit earlier. It can come in handy in some of your other classes. Besides that, everything looks good. You might run into some problem with course offering and timing, but even after you discount that, the schedule looks great. You are going to destroy all your finance courses with your computing skills...

And I have to say, you are very lucky to get a math major without abstract algebra.
 
Your schedule looks very rigorous. Looks a lot like my college schedule =]
Haha thanks. Where did you go for undergrad? And where are you now ;-)

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models In Business, sounds like a business stats class. Is this required?
Yes, it is essentially required for the finance degree; it is that or some even less quantitative courses.

BTW did you include the grad courses that you are planning on taking? I think you can add some stochastic classes in there. And maybe take numerical analysis a bit earlier.
Some of the courses, particularly comp sci courses, are considered senior undergrad / grad. However, I really can't fit anything more in my schedule :P

Can you explain why it is imperative to take numerical analysis earlier? I was thinking to have it later so it is still fresh in my mind when I go to MFE...

Thanks a lot for your response!
 
You don't really have to take numerical analysis earlier. But I assumed that you are going to apply to MFE starting fall 2010, and it would be good to have that course in your transcript before then. If you do well, the professor might even be a recommendation candidate. But again, you don't really have to.

And I will send you a PM regarding my background sometimes later.
 
Again... this is theoretical xD
I won't be applying for an MFE until... 2015? :D
Although your recommendation candidate point still stands.

Thanks.

EDIT: Also, I didn't see any classes labeled as stochastics, but I believe some of the courses have them as part of the syllabus.

---------- Post added at 04:02 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:45 PM ----------

Any other thoughts :)
 
A very ambitious plan that I believe would prepare you for a MFE program.

But looking briefly at the catalog and your schedule, I feel that by trying to cover so many topics you end up only get the basics (so called scratching the surface) instead of really digging deep.

I will throw a few courses from the catalog that sound interesting to me and could possibly be applicable:
MATH 416 Applied Harmonic Analysis: An Introduction to Signal Processing
MATH 420 Mathematical Modeling
MATH 452 Introduction to Dynamics and Chaos
MATH 456 Cryptology
CMSC 426 Image Processing
CMSC 477 Optimization
BMGT 365 Entrepreneurial Finance, and Private Equity
BMGT 444 Futures and Options Contracts
BMGT 446 International Finance


Also I didn't check degree requirements but it looks like a number of your courses are "business fluff" requirements that in my opinion would be better to replace with more math/computer science. Drop the business major and just take the finance courses that interest you if they will let you.
 
Also I didn't check degree requirements but it looks like a number of your courses are "business fluff" requirements that in my opinion would be better to replace with more math/computer science. Drop the business major and just take the finance courses that interest you if they will let you.

This can vary depending on where you want to go. For front-office jobs I think some business courses can be beneficial. I think you are taking enough quant courses and it wouldn't hurt to mix it up with some business ones. It can provide the soft skills needed in interviews and workplace. But you definitely should try to see if you can replace the business stat course with a more rigorous one.

Another way to dig deep is to try to design reading courses or independent studies with a few professors on advanced topics. This shows your interest in the field and your willingness to take on challenges. And it can lead to very strong recommendations down the road, and maybe even internship opportunities if your professors have contacts in the industry. Plus, it can help a lot if you ever change your mind and decide to go get a finance PhD instead. My $0.02.
 
Maryland has a nasty policy of not letting you take too many advanced courses outside your major. On top of that, I do not get acess to the lemma senbet fund, which sounds VERY nteresting to me.

Some of the courses listed share the same credit with a course I am taking; e.g BMGT 444 cannot be taken after the introduction to Finance course.
A very ambitious plan that I believe would prepare you for a MFE program.

But looking briefly at the catalog and your schedule, I feel that by trying to cover so many topics you end up only get the basics (so called scratching the surface) instead of really digging deep.

I will throw a few courses from the catalog that sound interesting to me and could possibly be applicable:
MATH 416 Applied Harmonic Analysis: An Introduction to Signal Processing
MATH 420 Mathematical Modeling
MATH 452 Introduction to Dynamics and Chaos
MATH 456 Cryptology
CMSC 426 Image Processing
CMSC 477 Optimization
BMGT 365 Entrepreneurial Finance, and Private Equity
BMGT 444 Futures and Options Contracts
BMGT 446 International Finance


Also I didn't check degree requirements but it looks like a number of your courses are "business fluff" requirements that in my opinion would be better to replace with more math/computer science. Drop the business major and just take the finance courses that interest you if they will let you.
 
Also Connor, can you explain why you chose those courses? I mean, I like image processing as much as the next guy but...
 
Also Connor, can you explain why you chose those courses? I mean, I like image processing as much as the next guy but...

I just threw those courses out as an example because they sound interesting to me, but my main point was it doesn't seem like your current schedule has you taking many upper level courses for each subject, just enough to get the major.

I don't remember where I heard this or if it is true but I remember hearing something about using techniques from image processing in finance....can anyone confirm/deny?

I feel that you are approaching this in a safe, "jack-of-all-trades master of none" kind of way. You need to explore things before you can really narrow down your interests, and no one knows what skills/knowledge will be useful in the future. Did people ten years ago know that telecom routing programming experience would be useful in high frequency trading? I doubt it.

goodstudent has a point about the soft skills.

If you are interested in quant stuff, I don't see it as a valuable use of your time to be taking things like Principles of Accounting, Practicum in Ethics, or Marketing. If you later need these type of classes/knowledge, just go get an MBA.

Any chance of a minor in finance?
 
Nope, they do not offer a minor. And you need to be a finance major to do the Senbet fund...

Still, I feel as if I am taking some upper level courses... :|
I mean undergrad students only have access to courses up to level 4__... although I understand your jack-of-all-trades point, how am I not taking challenging courses? :|

I am not trying to disagree or be a whiny little kid, I just legitimately don't understand.
 
I don't remember where I heard this or if it is true but I remember hearing something about using techniques from image processing in finance....can anyone confirm/deny?

Image processing uses numerical methods like finite difference on various partial differential equations including the heat equation, which is directly related to the black-scholes equation. It also involves programming, depending on what language your professor uses. I would say it is definitely useful for finance. Take it if you are interested.
 
What Connor mentioned is a good point: it may be better if you take more upper level classes on one major or another.

Focus is an important thing to have, and an admissions committee would surely appreciate it. Knowing what you want and going as deep down the rabbit hole as possible is a great asset in this world.
 
Again, can someone please explain their definition of a "upper level class"?
Is a 4__ level class not upper-level!?!?!
 
Yes it is, but I think esahione meant that you should take more 4__ classes in one major, instead of a little bit of everything.

Yes, this is what I meant.

For instance, I see that you're taking several business classes, which in my opinion is a complete waste of time. If I were you, I'd either drop the business major, since you're not really studying finance except for one or two classes, and try to get some graduate level classes in there. Or at least try to take the finance classes without being enrolled in the business major.

This would free credits up so that you could get classes like:
1) MATH432 - Intro to Topology
2) MATH420 - Applied Harmonic Analysis: Intro to Signal Processing
3) MATH414 - Ordinary Differential Equations
4) AMSC466 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis
5) MATH475 - Combinatorics and Graph Theory (Discrete Mathematics)

And then begin taking graduate-level classes, because if you're good, your fame on the department will get easily get you into the graduate level classes.

Then I'd take Abstract Algebra, since it is extremely interesting and will give you breadth in mathematics, Applications to Linear Algebra, Real Analysis, Dynamical Systems I, and so on.

A lot of stuff you can take that will actually make you smarter, in comparison with business classes that any idiot can ace.
 
I suppose that's true. I'd like to point out that I'm already taking these classes
3) MATH414 - Ordinary Differential Equations
4) AMSC466 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis
In different form (different name, but same credit; for example, AMSC466 is the same as the CMCS course.) But I suppose that is not the point.

While it is true that business courses won't make me smarter and any idiot can ace them... isn't that potentially a good thing? First of all, it will make my schedule a little bit easier to bear, and it could also mean that I can easily climb to the top of the class.

In economic terms, what is the real Marginal Utility of me taking those other classes mentioned?
EDIT: Also I'd rather not take Abstract Algebra... the other high level classes I can manage but Abstract Algebra is rather a ***** :P
Thanks for all your input, eagerly waiting for rebuttals.
 
I just looks like you're trying too hard. Just focus on a degree or double major and be done with it.Take it a year at a time, you never know what may happen, and you don't want to spread yourself too thin.

If you are that good, MFE may not be a consideration as you should already be working in finance..then you may take it later. MFE is highly specialized, and the market may be pretty flooded by the time you get there. You want to have a solid base for any type of quantiative work, don't try too hard to have exactly an MFE profile, I think it's a bad idea. Really planning your next 6 years in advance in such explicit terms is an exercise in futility IMO. It's good to have a general idea and plan, but this is overkill.
 
This isn't set in stone - the idea is that I could see what kind of courses I would be able to take in order to compare colleges. I actually kind of liked this schedule and decided to ask quantnet about it. :P
 
I suppose that's true. I'd like to point out that I'm already taking these classes
3) MATH414 - Ordinary Differential Equations
4) AMSC466 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis
In different form (different name, but same credit; for example, AMSC466 is the same as the CMCS course.) But I suppose that is not the point.

While it is true that business courses won't make me smarter and any idiot can ace them... isn't that potentially a good thing? First of all, it will make my schedule a little bit easier to bear, and it could also mean that I can easily climb to the top of the class.

In economic terms, what is the real Marginal Utility of me taking those other classes mentioned?
EDIT: Also I'd rather not take Abstract Algebra... the other high level classes I can manage but Abstract Algebra is rather a ***** :P
Thanks for all your input, eagerly waiting for rebuttals.

It depends on your utility function, as always. In fact, you're the one paying for those classes.

I'd rather pay for something which is useful, than for something which would get me a higher GPA, but this may be because I can manage taking harder classes and keeping a high GPA.
 
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