How should I choose where to get my PhD in Math to be a quantitative analyst later?

anonymouse

New Member
I get offers from a few Math phd programs in the US and would like to study probability/stochastic calculus and become a quant later. One is a University of Washington on the West Coast (close to California) with lots of people working on probability. One is a Boston University on the East Coast (close to New York), with fewer people working on probability.

Appreciate if anyone would be able to comment on internship opportunities/ networking among quants of East Coast vs West Coast.
 
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qdogg

New Member
Calling Washington "close to California" and Boston "close to New York" could be a bit of a stretch
 

anonymouse

New Member
Calling Washington "close to California" and Boston "close to New York" could be a bit of a stretch
When I used the word "close" I mean on the same side of the coast. You might have a different definition of that word but in the context I'm laying out, "close" should mean exactly that.
 

TehRaio

Active Member
try to have Eugene Stanley (He is in the physics department) as a co-advisor for your math PhD at boston. He's the pioneer of complex systems application to finance and economics. You will learn something new, yes it's not probability/stochastics but hey it can be a differentiating factor.
 

anonymouse

New Member
try to have Eugene Stanley (He is in the physics department) as a co-advisor for your math PhD at boston. He's the pioneer of complex systems application to finance and economics. You will learn something new, yes it's not probability/stochastics but hey it can be a differentiating factor.
I will keep that in mind. Thanks!
Are you familiar with some departments at Boston University then? Overall BU seems like a decent school although its math department is quite small and that worried me a little bit. Not sure the same applied for the physics department though.
 
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