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Ideal degrees for Quantitative Finance in Australia

Hey guys, look idk if i’m allowed to explicitly say my age but i’m a high school student in the younger range of years, in Australia, aspiring to become a quant.

I’ve figured this due to my strengths and interests in finance, stats, maths and coding.

Unfortunately here in Australia there are no Financial Engineering courses, so i’m leaning towards a bachelors in data science, statistics or computer science.

I just have a few questions;

Are these degrees optimal for becoming a quant?

Any advice for a high schooler?

Is it worthwhile getting a Masters, and attempting to get a job in the US?

Brutal honestly would be greatly appreciate, as well as any other advice you could give. thanks heaps.
 
I'm an undergrad in Australia, also thinking of a career in quantitative finance (more so quant trading). From the job ads I've seen, the jobs require people with strong problem solving and quantitative skills and know how to program. I think a degree with like maths/statistics and computer science would be a great combo. I would suggest looking at some quantitative finance job ads to get an idea of what they are looking for.

Since you're in high school, I recommend:
  • taking your schools hardest maths subjects (and do well at them) and doing competitions like the Australian Maths Competition,
  • learn programming over the holidays (if you haven't already started, I found that its much easier to learn if I have a problem in mind I wanna solve),
  • and find friends that might be interested in this as well and learn together because it will make it a lot easier
I'm not sure if it is worthwhile to get a Masters, since I haven't done it. I would only do a Masters if I knew for sure I wanted to quant finance. I think the easiest way to get a job in the US, is by joining a global company with an office in AUS and moving from there.
Other than that, I think it's important to be open to other possible paths and careers.
 
I'm an undergrad in Australia, also thinking of a career in quantitative finance (more so quant trading). From the job ads I've seen, the jobs require people with strong problem solving and quantitative skills and know how to program. I think a degree with like maths/statistics and computer science would be a great combo. I would suggest looking at some quantitative finance job ads to get an idea of what they are looking for.

Since you're in high school, I recommend:
  • taking your schools hardest maths subjects (and do well at them) and doing competitions like the Australian Maths Competition,
  • learn programming over the holidays (if you haven't already started, I found that its much easier to learn if I have a problem in mind I wanna solve),
  • and find friends that might be interested in this as well and learn together because it will make it a lot easier
I'm not sure if it is worthwhile to get a Masters, since I haven't done it. I would only do a Masters if I knew for sure I wanted to quant finance. I think the easiest way to get a job in the US, is by joining a global company with an office in AUS and moving from there.
Other than that, I think it's important to be open to other possible paths and careers.
thank you, i’ll be learning to program after ive got done with exams and everything. i’m thinking python, is that a good option?

i’ll be doing the hardest maths next year so i should be set up well hopefully. cheers
 
There are MFE programs in Australia. They're labelled as either MS in Financial Mathematics or MS in Quantitative Finance. The best programs are in Sydney and there's a decent one at Monash in Melbourne. You can also do a Masters in Applied Mathematics & Statistics, where you will be going with similar curriculum anyway.

Do a bachelor in mathematics and then do your master. If you get accepted into a bachelor of applied math at UNSW, ANU, MELB, SYDNEY, UTS, your pathway will be pretty clear by then - you might not even need a masters.
 
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