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Interview books

Hello quantnet I need some advice. Im prepping again for interviews and just had an internship at a large asset manager doing asset allocation model. I’m looking for good interview books or resources to prepare me to apply for asset management and quant trading positions. Any advice or recommendations?
 
These are the books that i think are most helpful:
-A Practical Guide to Finance Interviews, Xinfeng Zhou
- Quant Job Interview, Mark Joshi et al.

Good luck!
 
These are the books that i think are most helpful:
-A Practical Guide to Finance Interviews, Xinfeng Zhou
- Quant Job Interview, Mark Joshi et al.

Good luck!
Thanks what kind of jobs are you applying to. I’m gonna apply late November/December due to some health stuff but only looking at trading or set management for now
 
@Michsund - buy side are less into the brain teasers than sell side I think. Take this w/ grain of salt, since I was middle office and never directly interviewed for research yet. I did have a few of the "light a rope at both ends" and large circularly violent villages with axes, and maybe even find the fastest horse out of 25 w/ min number.

Off the beaten path, "Moscow Puzzles" is a good set, and Kritzman's The Portable Financial Analyst has some cool ones.
 
the classic interview books don't put as much emphasis on regression and coding, which is what buy side is more so testing nowadays. brainteaser or not depends on whether they have a large enough pool of applicants that brainteasers are needed to whittle down the pool, otherwise why can't they just directly assess your skills with a take home data science challenge.

this one is free but imo the best resource
 
also, which books are good for beginners in general? are books like "options futures and other derivatives" by john hull and books on stochastic calculus a good place to start. and are suuch books needed for interviews?
 
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