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Princeton MFin Interview Tips for Princeton MFin

Did anyone get else got an accept after yesterday’s release of invites? Did anyone get any rejects? Any info would be helpful. Thanks
 
May be it worth to help future applicants to collect some data points. Have those admits/rejects taken the math assessment? Do you think that affect the final decision? I took one and I think I did well in that.
 
May be it worth to help future applicants to collect some data points. Have those admits/rejects taken the math assessment? Do you think that affect the final decision? I took one and I think I did well in that.
(Waitlisted) No math assessment, no second round alumni interview
 
Hey, just want to ask you all for your thoughts between MIT MFin and Princeton MFin
Both are clearly really good in terms of their brand names and have purchase at any job (sell side or buy side). Historically MIT has had better dedicated career services than Princeton and the career services at MIT are often a big selling point for many prospective students since it helps for jobs a lot. On top of that, Princeton generally has a more theoretical bent as a school (more mathematical and rigorous) compared to MIT which has a more practical bent (also quantitative but focused on building skills for the job). Of course, which philosophy of teaching you like is a matter of your taste. If your goal is to maximize your job prospects, you need to optimize for 1. skills learned and 2. name (all top programs have a good name). On 2, these two are pretty equal. On 1, MIT seems better. Just for reference, a good friend just finished the Princeton Mfin and says even the coding courses there can be somewhat more theoretical.
 
Both are clearly really good in terms of their brand names and have purchase at any job (sell side or buy side). Historically MIT has had better dedicated career services than Princeton and the career services at MIT are often a big selling point for many prospective students since it helps for jobs a lot. On top of that, Princeton generally has a more theoretical bent as a school (more mathematical and rigorous) compared to MIT which has a more practical bent (also quantitative but focused on building skills for the job). Of course, which philosophy of teaching you like is a matter of your taste. If your goal is to maximize your job prospects, you need to optimize for 1. skills learned and 2. name (all top programs have a good name). On 2, these two are pretty equal. On 1, MIT seems better. Just for reference, a good friend just finished the Princeton Mfin and says even the coding courses there can be somewhat more theoretical.
Where are you getting this info from? I don’t think it’s very accurate.

MIT MFin students have had trouble competing with MIT MBA students and undergrad students for jobs, and their large class size does not help. Meanwhile, Princeton has a much smaller class size and dedicated career services, so I would say Princeton is better in that sense.

Additionally, Princeton’s curriculum is much more quantitative whereas MIT’s has a stronger focus on traditional finance. So if your goal is to become a quant, Princeton would be a better fit.
 
Well, I am not sure how you're inferring your opinion about career services. Just looking at the career report says otherwise. Also, it's counterintuitive that the program with 120+ people has better career support than a program with barely 30 students. Secondly, about the skills learned, what exactly are the skills you're referring to? Could you be more objective in stating what additional skills you would learn at MIT and not at Princeton? About programming being theoretical seems like a distorted fact. I've seen their curriculum and spoken with their alumni, the CS courses MFin students take at Princeton are well designed and the ML courses are from CSML(CS Dep).
Not to belittle your opinions, but is it a coincidence that you created your account just to post this answer? Apologies, I don't intend to question your authenticity but it's difficult to trust what people say online especially when their account is a freshly created one.
PS. I have offers from both and I'm just looking for objective facts to make my decision.
 
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