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Is MFE the right degree to help one get in risk?

I read the article from the reading list about what quants do, and risk is not mentioned. So it seems to me that risk is not a traditional quant job? Correct me if I'm wrong. Therefore, I am wondering if MFE is the degree to go for if you want to get in risk?
 
I read the article from the reading list about what quants do, and risk is not mentioned.

Are we reading the same quant guide?

"1. What does a quant do?
A quant designs and implements mathematical models for the pricing
of derivatives, assessment of risk, or predicting market movements."

"Having a masters degree in Financial mathematics but no PhD tends
to lead into jobs in banking in risk or trading support but not straight
quant jobs. "

ref: www.markjoshi.com/downloads/advice.pdf
 
Thanks for the replies! I meant to say that risk isn't mentioned in "What sorts of quants are there?" And Amanda's second quote also suggests that risk positions aren't "straight quant jobs". So are people working in risk considered quants?
 

Abdel

Economist
Thanks for the replies! I meant to say that risk isn't mentioned in "What sorts of quants are there?" And Amanda's second quote also suggests that risk positions aren't "straight quant jobs". So are people working in risk considered quants?

Don't need an MFE, you can get the PRM or FRM titles.
 
I read the article from the reading list about what quants do, and risk is not mentioned. So it seems to me that risk is not a traditional quant job? Correct me if I'm wrong. Therefore, I am wondering if MFE is the degree to go for if you want to get in risk?
That article was written years before the pre-crisis when the focus was on derivatives, pricing, structuring, prop trading, etc.
The crisis brought more prominence on risk management roles.

You can't take that article as "the definite career guide". Read current article, industry news, etc.
Here is another good starter read http://www.quantnet.com/quant-job-advice-from-wall-street-executives/

As is mentioned before, many MFE grads work in RM. It does not mean you will automatically be qualified. Like other jobs, it has a lot to do with if your MFE program has a strong relationship with hiring RMs, practical curriculum, and good teaching from practitioners from the Street.
 
That article was written years before the pre-crisis when the focus was on derivatives, pricing, structuring, prop trading, etc.
The crisis brought more prominence on risk management roles.

You can't take that article as "the definite career guide". Read current article, industry news, etc.
Here is another good starter read http://www.quantnet.com/quant-job-advice-from-wall-street-executives/

As is mentioned before, many MFE grads work in RM. It does not mean you will automatically be qualified. Like other jobs, it has a lot to do with if your MFE program has a strong relationship with hiring RMs, practical curriculum, and good teaching from practitioners from the Street.

Thank you for the info Andy. Since Baruch's MFE program offers a few courses related to risk, it seems to me that the program would be a good option for someone who wants to get in risk? Any comments on the quality of the courses (especially the new class MTH 9868 Advanced Risk and Portfolio Management) would be appreciated.
 
I don't have first hand experience with those courses at Baruch since they were offered/revamped recently but from what I can tell, it has pretty solid risk management courses, teaching staff who are practitioners. Plenty of their graduates end up working in Risk at Morgan Stanley.
The 9868 is a semester long version of this bootcamp
http://www.quantnet.com/forum/threa...agement-arpm-bootcamp-by-attilio-meucci.7059/
 
I don't have first hand experience with those courses at Baruch since they were offered/revamped recently but from what I can tell, it has pretty solid risk management courses, teaching staff who are practitioners. Plenty of their graduates end up working in Risk at Morgan Stanley.
The 9868 is a semester long version of this bootcamp
http://www.quantnet.com/forum/threa...agement-arpm-bootcamp-by-attilio-meucci.7059/
Thanks for the reply. That is the info I needed!
 

dstefan

Baruch MFE Director
In the Baruch MFE Program, we have a 14 week course
MTH 9845 Market and Credit Risk Management
taught by Professor Ken Abbott from Morgan Stanley

Beginning this Fall 201 semester, we are offering a seven weeks course
MTH 9882 Fixed Income Risk
taught by Dr. Arya Sekhar from Morgan Stanley
 
In the Baruch MFE Program, we have a 14 week course
MTH 9845 Market and Credit Risk Management
taught by Professor Ken Abbott from Morgan Stanley

Beginning this Fall 201 semester, we are offering a seven weeks course
MTH 9882 Fixed Income Risk
taught by Dr. Arya Sekhar from Morgan Stanley

This is great news. It seems like MTH 9882 isn't on Baruch's website yet. Is there any other new courses coming?
 

Lyosha

Psychic in Training
As a Baruch student I can tell you that this program will open those doors for you if that is where you want to go. A sizable chunk of the graduates go in that direction with their immediate post-graduation careers. Also, Ken is an amazing professor, one of the best I've ever had.

ARPM from what I have heard (I'll be able to comment better come August 25th after I've taken it...) is not quite the same as the Risk Management course, delving deeper into the mathematical theory and less into applications. But at this point that is hearse.

New courses appear at Baruch all the time... I'm not sure if the Machine Learning course is on the website yet either.
 
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