Princeton MFin is MFin offerred by Princeton good?

bluechimp

Member
Princeton's MFin claims to teach finance comprehensively -- this includes several subject that is viewed with slight disdain on QN (I think ;)): Corporate Finance, Accounting.. the 'soft' subjects, so to speak. Though to their benefit, the curriculum allows up to 12 electives courses that can be taken from the other top departments within Princeton (Econ, CS, Math, ORFE) to boost up the 'hard' part of the program. I don't think the program produces quants in its traditional sense, nor does it aim to be one. If you look at the placement record, there has been a healthy number of graduates going to IBD (gasp!) and private equity (even bigger gasp!).

My single biggest measure for 'goodness' has always been the employability of a program's graduates. Princeton has done quite admirably in that section; they have had perfect placement for full time and interns since the program's inception. Figures on their web noted that up until May 2009, 95% of 1st years have internships and 85% of the graduating classes already have job offers. This record is not exclusive to them, though.

So, to somewhat answer your question: if Princeton's program seems to teach you the stuff that you want to learn and do in the future, then rest assured that you'd be very likely to be easily employed. However, if you don't like how the program molds you to be a financial jack-of-all-trades or the sorts, then don't go there. I figured I should say this since most people that go to QN seems to be more interested in programs oriented towards molding purebreed quants.
 

bluechimp

Member
const451, that's what she said!

On a more serious note.. I was chatting actually with the Director of Corporate Relations, and it is a fact that they are cutting down on the class size for this year; primarily this is in response to the worsening job markets condition, although it is uncertain if they'd keep it this way. So, the low acceptance rate is definitely affected by this factor.

In my opinion, this is a double-edged sword. On one hand, this means that (maybe) the graduates of the program is crème de la crème. However, this definitely means that their alumni network grows at a much slower rate relative to other programs.

Furthermore, acceptance rate is only one proxy for quality of education. It is not necessarily conclusive that, school X has a low acceptance rate, ergo school X provides good education. If anything, low acceptance rate means that they have 'better' crop of students to begin with, but that says nothing about how the program molds them to be better practitioners.
 
Princeton's MFin claims to teach finance comprehensively -- this includes several subject that is viewed with slight disdain on QN (I think ;)): Corporate Finance, Accounting.. the 'soft' subjects, so to speak. Though to their benefit, the curriculum allows up to 12 electives courses that can be taken from the other top departments within Princeton (Econ, CS, Math, ORFE) to boost up the 'hard' part of the program. I don't think the program produces quants in its traditional sense, nor does it aim to be one. If you look at the placement record, there has been a healthy number of graduates going to IBD (gasp!) and private equity (even bigger gasp!).

My single biggest measure for 'goodness' has always been the employability of a program's graduates. Princeton has done quite admirably in that section; they have had perfect placement for full time and interns since the program's inception. Figures on their web noted that up until May 2009, 95% of 1st years have internships and 85% of the graduating classes already have job offers. This record is not exclusive to them, though.

So, to somewhat answer your question: if Princeton's program seems to teach you the stuff that you want to learn and do in the future, then rest assured that you'd be very likely to be easily employed. However, if you don't like how the program molds you to be a financial jack-of-all-trades or the sorts, then don't go there. I figured I should say this since most people that go to QN seems to be more interested in programs oriented towards molding purebreed quants.

IMO Princeton beats some of the Top 10 MBAs if your aim is ultimately to land a Job in IBD/PE as its cheaper can be finished in a year and has very high conversion in high yield areas of finance.
 
IMO Princeton beats some of the Top 10 MBAs if your aim is ultimately to land a Job in IBD/PE as its cheaper can be finished in a year and has very high conversion in high yield areas of finance.
It is a strong program that will offer you good chances of employment at the end. The program is a bit broad to be considered a pure MFE, however the faculty is good and they seem to have good career services. Related previous thread:
https://www.quantnet.com/threads/princeton-mfin-vs-columbia-msor.1321/
 
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