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Making up for a low CS GPA

binomial-torrent

Well-Known Member
Hi all,

In looking at GPA cutoffs for both grad school programs and job applications, I see it as imperative to make up for my CS GPA, which is ridiculously low (mostlys Cs and a few Bs). While my math/major GPA is high (but not even that high, hovering around 3.5), the CS GPA will be a huge bottleneck, especially if applying for machine learning focused CS grad programs, to the point where I can expect auto rejections. What are some good accredited online courses for CS? Discrete Math is actually one of the math classes I did poorly in and it is CS related, so it will probably bring my math gpa solidly above 3.5 as well. Where are some good sources to retake and how much will retaking help?

There's no good way to explain why it is so low to anyone in charge of hiring/admissions. The real reason it is so low is that the CS curriculum at my school was very software development and compiler/operating systems focused, not quantitative at all. And what I was really interested in was quantitative topics like programming logic, algorithm design, and ML/DL, so I had zero interest. Same for the "applied" math curriculum really, just a lot of watered down plug and chug. I had to pick up the slack on my own and take online stats courses and work on interview prep books to get up to speed.
 
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IntoDarkness

Well-Known Member
harvard extension is the most cost effective/reputable option but it's gona take a while to retake all relevant courses if you plan to take only one or two per semester
 

binomial-torrent

Well-Known Member
harvard extension is the most cost effective/reputable option but it's gona take a while to retake all relevant courses if you plan to take only one or two per semester

what about UC san diego extension? I just purchased data structures and algorithms from them for this summer since I have the time, and harvard extension only has spring 2020 which started in january
 

binomial-torrent

Well-Known Member
hmm might have to ask for a refund then. this is the link:
 

binomial-torrent

Well-Known Member
do u specifically have to take advanced versions of the courses u did bad in to overcome the gpa problem or can it be other classes as well? cuz if not i would rather take a deep learning class than introduction to programming again

is this one also not a real college course? Data Structures and Algorithms – COMPSCI X404.1

not sure how to tell
 
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princeofbelair

Active Member
well 3.5 is still an ok. Many people here have gotten into top MFE schools with that overall gpa, although I can't say how much your poor grades in CS courses would hurt you, but I think your gpa is sufficient enough to apply with. I think it's more worth your time doing projects. Georgia tech has an online CS master program that's insanely cheap and will reward you the same degree as if you were on campus. Reddit rumors that their acceptance rate is high, which I take as fact basically lol
 

binomial-torrent

Well-Known Member
well 3.5 is still an ok. Many people here have gotten into top MFE schools with that overall gpa, although I can't say how much your poor grades in CS courses would hurt you, but I think your gpa is sufficient enough to apply with. I think it's more worth your time doing projects. Georgia tech has an online CS master program that's insanely cheap and will reward you the same degree as if you were on campus. Reddit rumors that their acceptance rate is high, which I take as fact basically lol

my overall gpa is 3.1, it’s my math gpa that is 3.5
 

Song Han

Member
C++
If you want to learn some real stuff, I think many online courses are great, such as Machine learning in Stanford(coursera), or Bekerley CS61A(I am not sure which platform). They are really fantastic college level courses from top universities. But the problem is that I do not think online courses are accredited enough to compensate much for your GPA, because admissions are not sure if you are really doing a good job in those courses even if your grade is quite high.

For the people I know in the same position, they will take a summer session in some top universities. For example, if you take some advanced courses in UCB with their senior students, beated 3/4 of them and get straight As, no one will doubt your intelligence and programming skills. A even better and more expensive solution is to spent a year visiting a top university to "restart" your GPA. I knew a guy in my university that got an average GPA 3.3 in the first two years. He visited columbia for one year, achieved an 4.1/4.3, and went to Columbia MFE eventually. But those solutions are super expensive so it is hard to say whether a large sum of money and great effort is worthwhile for a better education background.
 

longgamma

Well-Known Member
C++
So I had posed a variation of this question to Dan Stefanica in Baruch's information session for their MFE. He suggested night classes at Hunter College are perfectly fine. Try reaching out to admissions people and ask for their advice rather than jumping into expensive distance learning courses based on recommendations from strangers.
 

Nth Root of N

Active Member
So I had posed a variation of this question to Dan Stefanica in Baruch's information session for their MFE. He suggested night classes at Hunter College are perfectly fine. Try reaching out to admissions people and ask for their advice rather than jumping into expensive distance learning courses based on recommendations from strangers.
To add another data point: certain M.S. programs at NYU also offer admission on a non-degree basis. (The policy used to be 12 credits.) During one of the info sessions last year for the M.S. Financial Mathematics, the program director had confirmed that this policy applies for that program, though obviously the applicant would be responsible for clarifying the details.

It is fair to characterize such an option as "super expensive", but it's probably also a more concrete way of getting a foot in the door.

Best recommendation is to reach out to people at schools you are very interested in, which costs nothing.
 
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