Math MS vs AM MS dual degree

Hi everyone,

I am a Physics PhD student at UM and I am planning to get a dual MS degree from Math department. I wonder if you can give me some advice here.

There are 2 degrees they offer, General Math and Applied Math. For Applied Math there will be two tracks. One for ODE, numerical analysis and scientific computing, the other for optimization and stochastic processes. Personally I am almost equally interested on these options, with a slightly more interest in the stochastic processes, since it's furthest away from my current research as Physics PhD.

I am interested in going into quant field after graduation from PhD. I wonder which one of these options would help me the most in being a quant?

Thanks in advance!
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Why not do both numerical and stochastic analysis. Otherwise 1/2 ready hitting the ground.
Stochastics is starved of good numerical methods. Few articles, books get beyond Euler's method...
 
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I would recommend going for the applied math as pure math wont help you here. Then depending on what you wanna do in the quant field you can specialize between the two sub-categories. I’m not to sure exactly how each one would help, but hopefully someone more experienced then me can shed some light.
some funds like pure math people if they then take the time to learn the quant stuff bottom up
 
Why not do both numerical and stochastic analysis. Otherwise 1/2 ready hitting the ground.
Stochastics is starved of good numerical methods. Few articles, books get beyond Euler's method...
It was two track designed by the department, so there is a slight difference in the elective course requirement. But I am sure I have some freedom to choose course from both sides. And it makes sense that learning both would be super helpful. Thanks for the insight!
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
It was two track designed by the department, so there is a slight difference in the elective course requirement. But I am sure I have some freedom to choose course from both sides. And it makes sense that learning both would be super helpful. Thanks for the insight!
yes, you will not regret it.
 
I'm a little curious... How would a physics phd at UM be considered then?
Michigan Physics is a top 15 PhD program. Math is up there too. I'm pretty confident you would be viewed favorably. What kind of physics are you doing research in?
 
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