Pure Mathematics Foundations course.What do you think?

Having started the C++ Programming for Financial Engineering free videos (I will definitely enroll as soon as I complete those), I now know from personal experience the value and depth of its creator's knowledge as well as teaching methods. In addition, having spent a lot of my free time researching what other online and non-online courses from universities have to offer (mainly within the UK but also intly) I have come to believe that this course ( Online Courses :: Datasim ) is the best option for people with similar backgrounds. That is economics/business/finance graduates who do not have adequate mathematical background to support a career in a quantitative discipline (quant analytics, statistical analysis, etc..).

Once again, I would like to point out that my goal is not to compete with candidates who have a PhD in Theoretical Physics but merely to be occupied in a quantitative function within finance. Simply because this is what I enjoy doing on a day to day basis. And I strongly believe that this course, if deemed adequate, could help many fellow business graduates follow this path. Moreover, I would like to highlight (like @Pavlos Sakoglou has many times pointed out to both me and the forum) that the candidate will have to put a lot of personal effort and sacrifice many things to gain solid understanding of the relevant topics. Besides the course itself, clearly states that is not a substitute for a BSc in Mathematics and should a candidate want the rigorousness of a BSc then he/she should go for one.

I would therefore, like to ask your opinion in regards to the syllabus of this course and whether you believe that would actually be beneficial.

Some remarks:
1)The course assumes that the candidates have knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. Besides most Economics courses (mine was a 4-year course) do cover calculus, linear algebra and probability theory but not extensively.
2)Daniel J. Duffy as well as his courses are already known in this forum. I would therefore like to point out that I am not advertising his course. I am just very excited that someone provides a "re-direction" course and would like the general opinion.
3)I am going for the course regardless the outcome of this thread, if there will be one.
4)Although many universities would accept me (I have exchanged emails with numerous professors as well as admissions offices) in relevant courses, I still would like to gain a solid math and stat background. However, doing another bachelors is not a choice as I am working full time and there are few-not that good- universities that offer part-time BSc in Math. Therefore, I need to study on my own+be guided before applying. I believe this is what this course offers.
4)Not long ago @bigbadwolf compared me to Groucho Marx. Although, this can be partly true (depending on how one interprets the meaning of the expression) it is definitely not the reason why I want to follow this career.

Many thanks
 
'Quantitative function within finance' is a sweeping generalization that encompasses multiple different departments and dozens of different roles.

-Non-quant developer?
-Data scientist?
-Quant developer?
-Strat?
-Research Quant?
-Risk Quant?
-Desk Quant?
-Trader?
-Risk Manager?
-Something else?

It says on the course website that it is designed for MSc students (I assume technical MSc like MFE, MS CS, MS Math) and current professionals. I do not think this course is meant to be used as a way to get a job, rather to supplement an actual degree (that will help you get a job) or an existing job.
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Learning a skill is always good. It's what you do with that skill is what makes the difference I suppose, in any walk of life.
 
'Quantitative function within finance' is a sweeping generalization that encompasses multiple different departments and dozens of different roles.

-Non-quant developer?
-Data scientist?
-Quant developer?
-Strat?
-Research Quant?
-Risk Quant?
-Desk Quant?
-Trader?
-Risk Manager?
-Something else?

It says on the course website that it is designed for MSc students (I assume technical MSc like MFE, MS CS, MS Math) and current professionals. I do not think this course is meant to be used as a way to get a job, rather to supplement an actual degree (that will help you get a job) or an existing job.

The generalisation was intentional. Although all these roles differ in nature, they have the same underlying requirement; solid mathematical and statistical understanding. Of course others require a more solid understanding than others or in different areas.
In regards to the course, a quick look at the syllabus and you will have your answer. I never claimed that one who has never studied mathematics can easily take this course. In my case, this course simply serves as a foundation course to a masters degree. Ie I do not expect I will become a quant after graduating from this course but merely get the necessary tool pack (and by tool pack I actually mean guidance and tutoring because personal effort is the biggest factor in this expedition) that will enable me to study an MSc in a relevant discipline. I apologise for that, I should have highlighted that.

By the way I am already working in a quantitative function.
 
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