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Quant risk analyst offer

Hey all, I’m graduating with a degree in physics and applied math this spring from a non-target school, and just received an offer from one of the major investment banks. The position is a quantitative risk analyst in their office in NYC.
I must say I was a bit underwhelmed with the offer. For $75,000/year base salary do you guys think it makes sense to move to NYC? Should I counter? I am still in the application pipeline for a quant hedge fund, so maybe I should tell them about that? Also, I am still waiting for replies from grad programs (Stanford, Columbia, Princeton, and Berkley) so maybe there is a benefit of getting a masters and then joining the industry if the salaries are that for fresh undergraduates.

I also wanted to know what you guys think of quant risk. I am much more excited about quant research and quant trading so I’m not sure if I take this role it will help me make a transition to either in the future.

Let me know! :)
 
You can counter, but if you are interested in quantitative risk that is definitely a better option than a grad program.

A grad program will take you ~1.5 yrs, cost you ~75K, and then you'll have to start looking all over again only for a 110k associate role.

Do this job well and you'll be at $100K in two years, with two years exp + no student debt.

No brainer for me.

As far as risk vs research / trading, it obviously pays less, but is also less competitive and less stressful hour-wise.
 
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