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Question regarding background for MFE/MS

Need your honest opinion on my chances to get enrolled in an MFE course.

Background: Civil engineering bachelors (B.Tech) from a prestigious university in my country with an 8/10 CGPI (2020)
Worked in manufacturing firm overseas in a field unrelated to anything finance for a few months. I discovered my interest in risk management during my job, decided to quit and will also be giving FRM this year. But I wanted to take my education to a higher level preferably with an MBA with finance specialization or MS in Financial Engineering (I prefer the latter because I am good with quants and I like dealing with numbers).​
I feel I am lagging in terms of background but planning to work as a research assistant for an year in a relevant field and also finish FRM L2 before applying for universities.​
I have taken the following courses which appear often in quantnet and have received AA or A grades in them.​
1) Differential eqn (2 courses)​
2) Linear algebra​
3) Calculus​
4) Statistics​
5) CS101​
I also have experience in Python and in working with deep neural networks​

My concern: Not a BS in maths/stats.
 
I think the question you should ask is whether you'll get into a top MFE program and not just any program. I think you have a fair shot at it given the engineering background. Not being a math/stats major is not detrimental to your application.
You seem to have the required background in math but I would say you lack a strong programming background (Just assuming, please correct me if I'm wrong)

I don't necessarily think the FRM adds considerable value to your application but it shows your interest and you used it to pivot between industries. I have a few questions you can ask yourself (and asked by programs btw) to gauge your chances.
1) Why MFE?
2) What skills have you gained in your experiences so far that would be helpful in an MFE program?
3) Describe a project/work experience that exhibits highly quantitative skills
4) What have you done to prepare for the MFE?
5) What is your background in Finance, what steps have you taken to learn more about the industry?

This is just a small example of the potential talking points but you get the idea. Basically, you need a compelling argument as to why you're a good candidate for an MFE. Your communication skills would be key here . You'll have to explain the past: What you studied in college and how that created a solid foundation of quantitative skills; the present: What you are doing currently to use those skills in the world of finance or at least related to finance; the future: What you intend to do ,career wise ,with the skills you gained and with the skills you will learn.

I think the research internship would be a good opportunity to gain some relevant experience. Aim for a 168+ quant score in GRE and strong LoRs and you should be okay. Most of the Indians that attend MFE programs are from an engineering background, so that's not even something to worry about.
 
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