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Requirements of MFE/MSFE

So I just started looking into MFE/MSFE graduate programs and I am becoming increasingly interested. However, I noticed on many websites it says students who apply should have an undergrad degree in a hard quantitative science (math/physics). Is this a rule that is strictly enforced by the gatekeepers or can there be some leeway? I am worried that this might hold me back considering I am in my senior year working towards an interdisciplinary math/econ degree.

Also, when is the best time to apply to these types of programs (straight out of college/after a few years of work experience)?

Sincerely,
Noob
 
Just look at the student profiles at a few programs and you see they breakdown into degree. I've seen people with History/Art/Law/Medical degree join and successfully got a job.
Hard science majors are more representative because they already have much of the requirements. If you come from a different major, just have to take extra course or stay longer to fill the list.

Nothing beats work experience. It can only help make your profile stronger, specially if you don't come from a quantitative background.
 
Just look at the student profiles at a few programs and you see they breakdown into degree. I've seen people with History/Art/Law/Medical degree join and successfully got a job.
Hard science majors are more representative because they already have much of the requirements. If you come from a different major, just have to take extra course or stay longer to fill the list.

Nothing beats work experience. It can only help make your profile stronger, specially if you don't come from a quantitative background.

Hi Andy,

I wanted to ask, does any type of work experience help? For example if someone like me who is from EE field have experience in the EE field will that be a positive thing or completely ignored?

Thanks,
Ohad.
 
Come on guys. A little common sense suggests that almost any professional experience in a decently quantitative field should be in some way useful, if only to expose you to team work, workplace dynamics, etc etc. In terms of technical skills, the more quantitative the better, but in the same way that you do not study veterinary science to become a doctor, the more directly your skills and past career relate to your next chosen career, the better.

Andy is good enough to respond to lots of questions, but its probably not the best use of his time to continuously field the same questions again and again and again.

Use your judgement. If someone asked you in an interview, "what have you done, and how can you relate it to this job that you are applying for", if you can't come up with a good reason or line of logic yourself, then that in itself should tell you something, don't you think?
 

roni

Cornell FE
I have a BBA in Finance (not quantitative at all), but I took many essential math/programming courses.
starting MFE in a month.
 
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