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Scaled scores for the new GRE are posted!

I can't wait to tell aspiring MFE applicants to get 170Q or else ;)
And everyone who managed to get 800 for quantitative part now will have 166 in their reports issued after November according to concordance table?
 
And everyone who managed to get 800 for quantitative part now will have 166 in their reports issued after November according to concordance table?
I don't believe so.
I think you mean ETS report. That's I don't know. But my guess is that they will have 800Q and 94th and provide the table for schools to use.
Application forms are not updated to only use the new format yet so you can enter 800 or 166 or a combination of them for all the tests you took.
If you took both, report 800 and 94th, 170 and 99th. Or only report the latest score. You do not need to translate the percentile from old to new. Let the admission people do the mental mapping for you.
 
i think you can answer 4 questions wrong to get 94 percentile (makes sense as new questions are harder from what people say).

Also for the new gre not only is harder to get 170 because all the questions should be right. you also have to answer harder questions.
 
I don't believe so.
I think you mean ETS report. That's I don't know. But my guess is that they will have 800Q and 94th and provide the table for schools to use.
Application forms are not updated to only use the new format yet so you can enter 800 or 166 or a combination of them for all the tests you took.
If you took both, report 800 and 94th, 170 and 99th. Or only report the latest score. You do not need to translate the percentile from old to new. Let the admission people do the mental mapping for you.
I thought we don't have a choice to report only the latest score. Don't all the scores for the last 5 years appear on the report card?
Also it looks like ETS will report estimated new score along with every old score by default. Isn't it the case?
 
From the GRE Guide (emphasis added by me):

Effective November 1, 2011, score reports
for individuals who tested prior to August 1,
2011, will contain estimated Verbal Reasoning
and Quantitative Reasoning scores on the new
130–170 score scale in addition to the Verbal
Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores
earned on the prior 200–800 score scale. This
concordance information, which is also available
at www.ets.org/gre/concordance, allows score
users to compare individuals who took the GRE
revised General Test with individuals who took
the GRE General Test prior to August 2011.

Well, if you had already scored 800Q on the old GRE, then consider the following strategy:
  1. Send out GRE score reports with your current (old exam) scores to EVERY school you plan to apply to
  2. Sign up for the new GRE test, but DON'T designate ANY score recipients.
  3. After you know your new GRE score, if you achieved 167, 168, 169, or (hopefully) 170Q on the new test, then pay ETS their extra fee to send out new score reports reflecting your higher percentile on the new exam.
  4. If you score poorly on the new test, then never send out any updated score reports -- the schools will only know that you received 800Q on the old GRE, and will not know that you took the new GRE (unless you are foolish enough to send out new score reports.)
  5. If you are ever asked why you have only submitted an "old" score, respond that you don't want to pay the extra money to take the test again.
 

twwsc

Newish Member
But then, what would be excuses for not making 170? After all, this is the general GRE and if you can get 170, isn't it looked upon much more favorable than someone with 800Q?

My thoughts exactly. Some forums are talking about this score adjustment being advantageous to the new test-takers, because getting the equivalent of an 800Q is now achievable with "less than a perfect score." But the pool of 800Q applicants was large enough to begin with, why wouldn't admissions take this opportunity to narrow the competition?
 
BTW, I think that it might be possible that such thing as 170 does not exist. What if more than 1% of test takers can answer all the question correct?
 
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