Target masters program to break into hedge funds (quant and/or non-quant)

I currently am a software engineer with an undergraduate degree in CS.

I'm curious if there are any masters program (finance, math, etc.) at target schools where hedge funds specifically recruit from (to become an analyst, trader, etc.)

I'm aware that this forum has a list of MFE programs, but these seem targeted towards quant roles. I was wondering if there's a target list for non-quant (discretionary) type funds as well.

I've done some light googling and some people recommend transferring into IB and then working your way into HF. Would appreciate people's input on this forum.

Thanks for any and all advice! Much appreciated.
 
Could be completely off on this, but if you are looking for a non-quant hedge fund (traditional finance role), I would aim for an MBA from a top business school.

Of course, even if you have the slightest interest in working for a quant firm then I recommend a graduate degree in either MFE, Comp Sci, etc. Or even just start applying for these hedge funds and see what comes back.

Would love anyone to correct me if they think differently. :)
 
I currently am a software engineer with an undergraduate degree in CS.

I'm curious if there are any masters program (finance, math, etc.) at target schools where hedge funds specifically recruit from (to become an analyst, trader, etc.)

I'm aware that this forum has a list of MFE programs, but these seem targeted towards quant roles. I was wondering if there's a target list for non-quant (discretionary) type funds as well.

I've done some light googling and some people recommend transferring into IB and then working your way into HF. Would appreciate people's input on this forum.

Thanks for any and all advice! Much appreciated.
Are you interested in quant or more traditional roles? The bankers that move from IB to HF/PE have career paths embedded in more traditional finance - they will pursue MBAs, CFAs, whatever. If you are interested in working in a more quantitative role (quant or traditional HF), you will be better suited with a STEM graduate degree.

But if you are interested in non quant jobs at any type of HF, that is a little longer of an answer. The reason HFs/PEs recruit so heavily from IB (senior) associates generally is due to their understanding of the products. In other words, your experience will be more important than your education. For example: Apollo has historically liked to take some of the risk from banks on CLO deals. They want bankers who work in underwriting/origination of these deals, these are the only guys who will actually understand these products. So Apollo (and every other fund), fills their ranks with experienced professionals who understand whatever products they buy. If this sounds more similar to what you want to pursue, I would find specific funds that you are interested in working for and talk to their analysts directly.
 
[...] Of course, even if you have the slightest interest in working for a quant firm then I recommend a graduate degree in either MFE, Comp Sci, etc. [...]
I opted for an MBA (at LBS), because with my social sciences background I would not be considered for the more quant finance masters. I aim to take all the 'hard' courses here which involve stochastic calculus, Brownian motion and use of coding for solving optimisation problems. I am sure I need to work more on my linear algebra and stats/probability. Does that sound like a plan or am I trying in vain?
 
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