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Undergraduate Degrees

Hey guys,

I am an aspiring quant and I'm considering possible undergraduate tracks...I have come up with three solid ones, let me know which you think is best. I also want to make sure which ever track I choose will help me get a decent starting job right after undergrad

1. Applied Math + Computer Science

2. Applied Math + Finance

3. Undergrad concentrations (ORFE @ Princeton or Columbia..I also believe Carnegie has one too)

I don't like my third option as much since it doesn't seem broad enough for undergrad. I want to leave my options open.
Also, here's a fourth option. Would staying in school for one extra year to get a master's be a possible option for me? I believe Carnegie Mellon has this accelerated program where you can get BS and MS by staying one extra year. The only disadvantage is no basic work experience before applying for jobs.
 
abcde - I did my first undergrad in Software Engineering and my second (in progress) in Banking and Finance.

I'd say some combination of Mathematics and Computer Science would be good.
 
I think Applied Math + Computer Science is the most appropriate even if I would suggest:
Physics + Computer Science.

It depends on which type of quant you want to become.However, since most of them are employed in High Frequency Trading and Credit Derivatives Structuring / Pricing , I would recommend not get bothered too much with finance.

You will not be able to compete with a guy who studied only finance as much as he is not going to have your mathematical abilities.

You have to push harder towards the direction which is going to give you more advantages,hence, in the case of a quant job, concentrates on numerical methods,stochastic calculus and programming because you cannot know everything.

Knowing a lot of things means you do not really master any.
 

alain

Older and Wiser
since most of them are employed in High Frequency Trading and Credit Derivatives Structuring / Pricing

This is very interesting. The skill set required by these two, let's call it "fields" for lack of a better term, is very different.
 
eh i personally don't like physics all that much. I like the math + comp sci track a lot. Maybe I can minor in something like finance or economics if i still have space...
 

alain

Older and Wiser
eh i personally don't like physics all that much.

mmmm... this might be a red flag. There is a reason why there are way more physicist in quant finance that mathematicians.
 
mmmm... this might be a red flag. There is a reason why there are way more physicist in quant finance that mathematicians.
So if I have an electrical engineering degree with physics minor ( all A for physics modules), will it help me much in my application?
 
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