What is the initial salary and career progression of a C++ programmer?

hiptipdips

New Member
Currently about to graduate with a BS in Computer Science and am wondering if there are any long-term career path benefits to specializing mainly in C++. I used this language predominantly throughout college and I gravitate towards it the most. What's the salary progression for someone starting out in C++ (can you even be a junior C++ dev?) and what's the outlook for a C++ programmer in the next 10 years in terms of compensation? I understand some C++ programmers make it onto hedge funds working on speed stuff, but am not sure if this is a reasonable, viable career path for an average performer who's not a math PHD.
 

hiptipdips

New Member
I am unaware that professional C++ programmers can be differentiated by 11, 14, etc.

My college uses C++ 17 predominantly for assignments. And I've been wondering if C++ is something you can completely specialize your career towards.
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
I suppose each organization supports its code base in a given version of C++. Then you can have a policy to upgrade to next version of C++. Admin and technical organizational issues,

C++11 is a huge release; C++14 is a fix IMO, C++17 is stuff that Boost had for years and haven't looked at C++20 "Mostly "changes") yet (I use code that is shipping because life is too volatile otherwise).

The biggest gaping hole IMO is that C++ still does not support modules (aka dlls, assemblies)
 
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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
And at the end of the day, it is the 20% of C++ in combination with develop design savvy that makes the difference.
 
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