What's a better bet to landing a 150k TC job: a master's in CS or an MFE?

hiptipdips

New Member
Trying to decide between an MFE or a master's in CS right now (I am close to finishing my BS in CS and math). I understand Baruch (and other such top programs) are boasting near 99% placement rates with banks. However, I think that a master's in CS would provide more flexibility and options (fintech, big tech companies, startups).

If my sole objective is to get the most ROI from a grad degree that will near-guarantee me a job after I graduate (possibly 150k TC, but I know some big tech companies can offer closer to 200k), which will be better: a master's in CS or an MFE?

Please assume I would be attending a T25 Master's in CS (not some unknown random school from nowhere)
 

quantsmodelsbottles

Active Member
If you do a top machine learning focused CS program that will pivot well to quant research, so that'd be the best option if you want to get into a good hedge fund. Otherwise, MSCS would be very helpful for the developer route, finance or not, and MFE will still be accepted by banks and certain funds.
 
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longgamma

Member
C++ Student
Trying to decide between an MFE or a master's in CS right now (I am close to finishing my BS in CS and math). I understand Baruch (and other such top programs) are boasting near 99% placement rates with banks. However, I think that a master's in CS would provide more flexibility and options (fintech, big tech companies, startups).

If my sole objective is to get the most ROI from a grad degree that will near-guarantee me a job after I graduate (possibly 150k TC, but I know some big tech companies can offer closer to 200k), which will be better: a master's in CS or an MFE?

Please assume I would be attending a T25 Master's in CS (not some unknown random school from nowhere)
You cant possibly learn a lot about derivatives valuation, risk mgmt, algorithmic trading etc from a CS degree. Its just my two cents on this. Think of the signalling potential of the MFE degree - employers know for sure that you want to work in quant finance.
 
The CS degree. It's more focused. If you wanted, you could read one or two books on financial math/programming on your own. You would have the CS ability to build something beyond the basics. The CS degree is safer with just as much, if not more, upside. Just don't let your math skills evaporate. Math/Stat courses would be great electives in your CS masters program.
 
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