Which quant program in Europe

npael

New Member
I am an undergraduate student of Finance with GPA 3.54. I want to do a master in quantitative finance/financial engineering.I have done in my studies linear algebra, statistics, probabilities, econometrics, time-series, stochastic calculus,2 courses in computational finance with MATLAB.Also I did an online course in JAVA from my university(140 hours duration) and I am finishing the financial engineering online program of Columbia in Coursera.My score in GMAT is 710 (50Q, 35V).But I know that quant masters prefer students from mathematics departments or physics or electrical engineering.I have an internship in a brokerage firm in the department of derivatives(not so quantitative).As for my goal in job industry I would like to do algorithmic trading,work in HFT, generally in front office positions in Hedge funds or investment banking.
Now I am looking for master programs .So I need your help.

Imperial College London RMFE: high-ranked university,very good placement rate,good position but it doesn't seems so quantitative and most of the graduates go for risk management positions


LSE Fin Maths: high-ranked,very good placement,good position but I have read that is very theoretical program.Also it is very difficult to get in as it takes only 25 applicants.


UCL Computational Finace: it focuses more on programming(something that I want) but on the website I can't find information about placement statistics.Somewhere I read that it has a good placement rate(95%).


Warwick Fin Maths:good ranking but it has not so good reputation as other programs of this University.Also it is outside London.


Bocconi Quantitative Finance and Risk Management: lower tuition fees than UK universities but 70% of the graduates go in risk management positions.Also, it has not big reputation.


Bocconi Finance:very good reputation but it is a Finance program(not quantitative) and in the first year it looks like a repetition of my undergraduate studies.


ETH Quantitative Finance: very good reputation,high-ranked uni but many people say that without knowledge of French or German it is difficult to work in Switzerland.Also it is very difficult to get in.


EPFL FE: focuses on the programming(from what I understood from the curriculum), but the same problem as ETH.Also not so good reputation.


I am very confused so need some help in order to find the suitable programs in Europe which will help me to find a job in high frequency trading(or in quant research at first stage) in Europe.I would like your opinion about the programs mentioned but if you know other programs I have no problem to discuss.
 
Last edited:

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Maybe structure the layout a wee bit to make it more readable. e.g. remove redundant stuff.
 
I have an internship in a brokerage firm in the department of derivatives(not so quantitative)
Really? SO I guess you aren't involved in pricing via models, since derivative is very inline with Quant work.

But I know that quant masters prefer students from mathematics departments or physics or electrical engineering
Depends on the program. Proper math course alone (not a full degree) are enough.


As for my goal in job industry I would like to do algorithmic trading,work in HFT, generally in front office positions in Hedge funds or investment banking.
- HFT? Haha. So they toughest one huh? I think HFT folk are more Computer Scientist with Quant projects, than they are Quants. Do you want to be a Computer Scientist (aka Software Engineer)?
- Algo Trading is a bit different. It allows for longer timeframes. This is a better aim.
- Please familiarize yourself with more jobs and what they reuiqre, so you don't try to boil the ocean or think it's all about school rank
- Trading | Flow Traders

most of the graduates go for risk management positions
I used to think this sucked too. Turns out, a huge part of quant modeling involves volatility aka risk. The "Risk Management" department includes model - development, validation, implementation, for "risk" models on everything from FX to complex derivatives. In short, seeing people get placed in Risk Management, is good. Not to belabor the point, but volatility modeling is a key part of Econometrics. You need to look up some Quant jobs, and find out what branch of the company they are under. Many are part of risk.


Switzerland is a great location for work. If you can get into the school, do so. Get a tutor, and learn what you can of the extra language. It will be worth it. Also, large companies communicate in English because they are multi-national or global. You won't need French, Dutch, German, or Italian fluency to work in Switzerland. You will also have an advantage of being (I'm assuming) a native English speaker.

Please compare the course offering of these places. Placement rates aren't the whole story. The right curriculum is.
* If a low cost school with the same curriculum existed, you cold easily take the lower cost school, knowing the exposure was the same, and the rest of the learning is up to you. Remember, all professor can't really teach. Top ranking schools are good for connection help, but it's not like you always need connections to get a job.

France has some good schools. EISTI? Also I think Belgium has some, like KU Leuven.
Also consider Germany. Many organizations have Internships than beyond just summer, and internships that you combine with the writing of your thesis. This is a great way to have some visible research.
 
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