3.0 Math GPA, top 20 US university

Onegin

Active Member
C++ Student
usually finding a good job trumps going straight to grad school. if i were in ur situation, i would find a relevant or very good job and doing some patch work (retaking courses) at side, then reassess every say 6 months
^^^^^ this.
 

IntoDarkness

Well-Known Member
i find this the best blend of affordability, credibility, and content:
 

quantsmodelsbottles

Active Member
I actually have a really bad computer science GPA (less than 3.0) even if math is solid and math was my major (and one of the classes in math I did bad in with Discrete Math which is very related to CS). Should I focus on that instead? I think someone mentioned a UPenn program a while ago. If your undergrad math is solid is it better to invest in ML/Stats/Algo courses?
 

quantsmodelsbottles

Active Member
@dongdinger given that you have to have an extremely high GPA in other areas besides math (such as chemistry/biology) to bring the overall to 3.6 from a 3.0 in math, what is your reason for pursuing quant in the first place? maybe biomedical data science would be better fit?

machine learning research with the right professors is good. so is sell side trading if it is quantitative enough.

i believe the order is top job > top school > mediocre job > mediocre school.
 

dongdinger

New Member
@quantsmodelsbottles
I have always been interested in math and did a lot of competition math in high school. Although I thought being a surgeon would be cool, I realized that I wanted to do something for quantitative. I think the reason I'm more willing to go to grad school is because for the longest time I planned on going to medical school which is significantly longer than MFE programs. I have a few "top" jobs offers (although a few others have exploded), but I would prob renege one if I get into a good program. And on a side note, our positions are slightly reversed in that my CS GPA is 3.9 or so, but my math gpa is poor haha

*Also I never actually got to properly apply to internships because I decided to pursue them late last spring semester, which probably is also a motivation for me.
 

quantsmodelsbottles

Active Member
@quantsmodelsbottles
I have always been interested in math and did a lot of competition math in high school. Although I thought being a surgeon would be cool, I realized that I wanted to do something for quantitative. I think the reason I'm more willing to go to grad school is because for the longest time I planned on going to medical school which is significantly longer than MFE programs. I have a few "top" jobs offers (although a few others have exploded), but I would prob renege one if I get into a good program. And on a side note, our positions are slightly reversed in that my CS GPA is 3.9 or so, but my math gpa is poor haha

*Also I never actually got to properly apply to internships because I decided to pursue them late last spring semester, which probably is also a motivation for me.
I think the competition math should be helpful for off setting the GPA.

As an aside I think surgeon is one of the top industries with psychopaths. Something about needing emotional cool?

I would imagine for an MFE they want to see employability and not failing courses. You have the first part down and for the second part your grades are just enough to pass a grad course. Have you looked into grad school in CS (best if focused on ML/DL/AI)? Seems like the high CS GPA could really be helpful. And it'll be better for the top funds to have a STEM grad degree instead of an MFE but you'll also be competing with PhDs. Regular CS grad degree should be fine for trader roles though
 

longgamma

Member
C++ Student
Hi all,

I'm an applied math major at a top 20 US school with a 3.0 math GPA (3.6 overall) and a 169Q on the GRE. I was originally pursuing medical school but decided to apply to MFE programs instead this cycle. I was completing the applications but was worried because they wanted me to list out grades for specific math courses. I got a C in Multivariable Calc, C+ in Linear Algebra, B in ODE, and the rest are more advanced modeling courses like numerical analysis (of which I got As and Bs on). I was focusing on courses like organic chemistry at the time of the two Cs, and foolishly decided to take the notoriously harder proof courses than the easier applied (engineering) version of linear and ODE. Other than that, I have machine learning research and a sell-side trading internship on my resume. How are my chances with a 3.0 Math GPA?
Do speak with admissions officers first and highlight how interested you are. Then slide in your GPA issue and ask if its problematic. Most admissions officers will indicate "what they are looking for" to be a little politically correct but that gives you a sense of what they expect. Some even would suggest remedial actions that you can take before applying.

GPA doesn't indicate the complete picture of the individual so try to highlight your interest by writing a strong sop, send them a git repo of your projects. I'd suggest you apply with guidance from admissions officers and you should be good. Top undergrad schools are pretty competitive in terms of grading and they do understand that.
 
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