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A Couple of friendly questions

Hi Quantnet,

I plan on applying to a MFin / MFE programs next year and I have a rough plan worked out and I was looking for constructive criticism.

my current situation is that I work for a bank in Boston after graduating from a state school. Finance major econ minor with a 3.1. Somehow I managed to take this resume to a big bank and finagled a job in wealth management for ultra high net worth individuals. I have passed all 3 levels of the CFA exams but I don’t have the charter as I have only been employed for 26 of the required 48 months. I reached out to UCLA for advice and introductions as well because they mention that the CFA is a plus.

right now I am taking classes at Harvard extension school to make up for my lack of a math background. Enrolled in calc 2 then I plan on calc 3 spring semester.

my main questions are, do you think I should take the GMAT or GRE? what other courses would be useful to makeup for a lack of quant background? And finally, I noticed that MIT Sloan has mixed reviews here but seems low on the list of 2020 rankings. Any chance my work experience might make up for this and give me a shot.
 
I would suggest to speak with someone from the admissions office first rather than strangers on the internet. You will get much better advice from them and in some cases a very frank assessment. Be sure to have well though out answers to simple questions like "Why quant finance and what have you done to show interest?"

GRE is the way to go for STEM programs and GMAT for bschools. Good luck!
 
I would suggest to speak with someone from the admissions office first rather than strangers on the internet. You will get much better advice from them and in some cases a very frank assessment. Be sure to have well though out answers to simple questions like "Why quant finance and what have you done to show interest?"

GRE is the way to go for STEM programs and GMAT for bschools. Good luck!

Thanks,

I do agree with the strangers on the Internet part, however, sometimes it’s worth having to dig through the dirt for the sake of connivence.

And i happened to learn something about the GRE, good point that I didn’t know.
 
I’d seriously consider more math classes. BU Metropolitan has affordable night classes. Consider:
MA 242 Linear algebra, MA 225 differential equations (not offered in MET, so more expensive), MA 581 Probability, MA 582 Mathematical Statistics, MA 583 Stochastic Processes, CS 231 Discrete Math, and CS 201 C++ / or quantnet C++ as sort of the minimum math requirements. Like bare minimum.

admissions is only half the battle. You still have to graduate from the program.
 
I notice that you put probability and statistics in there. I am pretty comfortable working with with this level of math as I managed to pass the SOA exam P at one point in my life. its not much, but it is a tough test that gave me a good foundation in probabilities, but I am hesitant to list it on an app because I doubt that an admin team would know what it is.

I guess you could say that my plan was to get an interview, then if anyone asked me another name for a second central moment, I could exceed that show a good understanding.

I do agree with the stochastic processes. its one of the few subjects not covered by Harvard extension.
 
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