Cornell FE Cornell MFE vs. Duke MSEM

newzealand

New Member
So I am in the unusual position of deciding between the master's in financial engineering program at Cornell and the master's in statistical and economic modeling at Duke.

I did my undergrad in economics at UChicago. I am originally from New Zealand and I returned home after graduation rather than taking a job in the US for family reasons. I have since decided I would like to be based in the US so applied to masters programs both to further my quantitate skill set and eventually find a job in the US. I could definitely see myself in finance, but would also be happy in tech or more quantitate consulting.

I know both programs have a very different focus, so I am having a hard time deciding. I was offered a merit scholarship by Cornell and a partial tuition waiver by Duke. Duke is a 2 year program and Cornell is 1 1/2 years, so the overall cost is almost the same.

Any advice or opinions on how to decide would be appreciated! I was also offered a scholarship to Vanderbilt's masters of finance program, but this seems like it would be less of a named school.
 

mhy

Active Member
What do graduates from the Duke program end up in? Based on your experience and interests, which program do you think will point you in the direction you want to go in?
 

newzealand

New Member
It's not entirely clear where Duke graduates end up, which I guess is what makes it hard. They do they very strong phd placement, but to be honest I would rather be in the data analytics side for a tech company.
 

mhy

Active Member
It's not entirely clear where Duke graduates end up, which I guess is what makes it hard. They do they very strong phd placement, but to be honest I would rather be in the data analytics side for a tech company.
Cornell MFE should give you more than enough skills to do data analytics. Overkill even, but you can always have plan A: financial job and plan B: tech job.
 

newzealand

New Member
Cornell MFE should give you more than enough skills to do data analytics. Overkill even, but you can always have plan A: financial job and plan B: tech job.
Thanks mhy, I guess I have always worried that an MFE might be too specific in finance. Which, while I'm interested in, I really don't want to end up doing back office risk modeling. In the long run I'd see myself going down the startup/VC route. I know both programs are an overkill for the quant level needed for this, but as an international in the US I really need to study something in a STEM field.
 

pingu

Well-Known Member
So I am in the unusual position of deciding between the master's in financial engineering program at Cornell and the master's in statistical and economic modeling at Duke.

I did my undergrad in economics at UChicago. I am originally from New Zealand and I returned home after graduation rather than taking a job in the US for family reasons. I have since decided I would like to be based in the US so applied to masters programs both to further my quantitate skill set and eventually find a job in the US. I could definitely see myself in finance, but would also be happy in tech or more quantitate consulting.

I know both programs have a very different focus, so I am having a hard time deciding. I was offered a merit scholarship by Cornell and a partial tuition waiver by Duke. Duke is a 2 year program and Cornell is 1 1/2 years, so the overall cost is almost the same.

Any advice or opinions on how to decide would be appreciated! I was also offered a scholarship to Vanderbilt's masters of finance program, but this seems like it would be less of a named school.
If you want to work in oil, go to Vanderbilt. Go there and thank me later.
 
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