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GRE Math subject helpful?

Hi everyone I am new to QuantNet. I have learned a lot from all of you, and hopefully I can contribute once I start applying to MSFE programs next year.
Since most applicants get 800 on GRE math, I am wondering if a high GRE Math subject score would be helpful. Will universities look at the score if it is not required? Thank you advance for your time!
 
although Chicago is the only school that officially requires the score, the general consensus is that if u take that test and manage a 75-80% its an added benifit primarily because it shows ur decidication and strong math skills..
so yea..imo..they do look at the score..
 
The GRE Math subject test looks like it is geared toward people who are seeking to do a Ph.D. in Mathematics.

http://www.ets.org/gre/subject/about/content/mathematics

http://www.ets.org/Media/Tests/GRE/pdf/gre_0809_math_practice_book.pdf

If you did an undergraduate degree in pure mathematics, then you should have learned all the material on the test, including the sections on Real Analysis, Abstract Algebra, Topology, etc.

If you did some other degree, then although you probably know the material on Calculus and perhaps Linear Algebra, you may have never seen some of this "other" material, and thus you may not score well on this test.

When you designate score recipients for the GRE, you have the option to send scores from the General tests only; the Subject tests only, or all scores from both types of exams.

http://www.ets.org/gre/subject/scores/send/

If you take the Math subject test and score poorly, perhaps you're better off not submitting such a score...
 
Thank you for your replies. I am majoring in EE with a minor in math. The content that I have not learned is abstract algebra and topology. I pick up math concepts fairly quickly, so I think I can spend a month or two studying those topics. So it seems that while a good score might be hard for me to get, a good score should certainly increase my chances?
 
If you did an undergraduate degree in pure mathematics, then you should have learned all the material on the test, including the sections on Real Analysis, Abstract Algebra, Topology, etc.

Just to clarify, it was my understanding that, in general, undergraduate degree in mathematics requirements did not cover everything for the GRE Math unless you specifically selected courses and/or took extra courses. Meaning that you could get an undergraduate degree in mathematics and not cover all the material on the GRE Math test.

Anyone know the answer?
 
I don't know about other universities, but at UIUC there are a lot of classes you can select from to get the math degree. So yes, if you didn't selected those courses specifically, they are not going to cover all the material on the GRE Math test.
 
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