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Is my program choice flawed? and ideas about Columbia's M in Statistics

Sorry to burst bubbles, but I personally don't distinguish between them. The real distinction is studied technical material at the graduate level vs didn't.


AMEN

My friend who does interviews for his bank says the same. And besides, it just makes sense!
 

Joy Pathak

Swaptionz
Sorry to burst bubbles, but I personally don't distinguish between them. The real distinction is studied technical material at the graduate level vs didn't.

The issue with the MFE and MSOR or MS Stats program, all of which are at Columbia is the basic fact as you mentioned about, " technical material at the graduate level ". As a non-MFE student the students don't have priority into the classes therefore refraining them from learning material. Assuming worse case scenario a student enters the MSOR program or the MS Stats and is not able to secure a seat in the class as he has to compete with the 100+ other students in his class and the MFE students. In this sense MFE > MSOR since the MFE students would always have high priority over the key financial engineering courses.

Otherwise, as I have said many times before, it is definitely what you're being taught/learning than the pure name of the program or school that translates into jobs. If the students of MS Stats, MSOR and MFE can have similar relevant courses that are required for the job then they are all equal. After that all that matters is how you answer the question that your interviewer asks you.
 

Joy Pathak

Swaptionz
Are we assuming that "technical material" specifically means financial engineering? If not, then any of the three could be considered technical.

I am assuming technical means, specifically financial engineering related courses. If not, then obviously Masters in Astrophysics is considered technical too. Then again, there are PhD's in Astrophysics who are in quant positions.
 
<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p> </o:p>if you are aiming at the quant roles I wouldn’t pay too much attention to the university name, whether it’s in the ivy league or not etc....no one cares about that (some dumb recruitment agents do, though). It’s your technical skills/knowledge and interest in the subject that matter. <o:p></o:p>
I don’t see anything wrong with going for Rutgers MFE. It’s a nice uni and a program is pretty solid.<o:p></o:p>
 
Hey guys ... Apologies for the interruption in the discussion ... I couldnt figure out where else to post my query ....

Well ... I'm trying to make a decision whether or not to go in for an MFE ... I've completed my FRM and CFA level 1 ... I thus have some of the finance - foundations set up but I have no programming background ... while I do realize that the MFE is a programming intensive course, considering my finance background, will it still be a struggle for me through the course?

Also, I am considering applying for the Berkeley MFE. Most other schools seem to need the GRE ... Having already taken the GMAT, I'm not too keen on taking the GRE ... however, the Berkeley MFE hardly seems to figure in your forum discussions ... I hope the program they offer is a decent one ... :)
 
Hey guys ... Apologies for the interruption in the discussion ... I couldnt figure out where else to post my query ....

Well ... I'm trying to make a decision whether or not to go in for an MFE ... I've completed my FRM and CFA level 1 ... I thus have some of the finance - foundations set up but I have no programming background ... while I do realize that the MFE is a programming intensive course, considering my finance background, will it still be a struggle for me through the course?

Also, I am considering applying for the Berkeley MFE. Most other schools seem to need the GRE ... Having already taken the GMAT, I'm not too keen on taking the GRE ... however, the Berkeley MFE hardly seems to figure in your forum discussions ... I hope the program they offer is a decent one ... :)

Try starting a new thread for your question. ;)
 
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