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Need Help for Housing in NYC

Don't ignore the possibilities in New Jersey which are close to the PATH train (Hoboken, Jersey City, etc.)

http://www.panynj.gov/path/maps.html

There you may be able to find some relatively inexpensive accommodation. I know several students (primarily from India) who lived near the "Journal Square" station while attending Baruch.

The campuses for NYU and Baruch are a short walk from the respective stations for this small train system, which runs along 6th Avenue in Manhattan.

Also, if you do eventually get a job (or a paying internship) and start earning money, living in New Jersey will mean that you would not be subject to the annoying NYC residents tax, which will suck up about 4% of your income in exchange for the privilege of living in NYC.

Also, note that NYU makes their dormitories available to non-NYU students during the summer months. If you would like to have a convenient place to stay during the summer, while looking for more permanent accommodations for the fall, it may be worth considering. The caveat is that you must vacate the NYU housing no later than August 11th.

http://www.nyu.edu/summer/housing/

Indeed, NYU's newest dormitory is located immediately adjacent to Baruch College:

http://www.nyu.edu/life/living-at-n...xplore-the-residencehalls/Gramercy-Green.html

Good luck!
 
You should also consider the Forest Hills/Kew Gardens area (Rego Park is ok too but you would have to take a local train to the 71st station which adds to the commute time). There are two express subway trains (E and F) going to Manhattan. Travel time going into Manhattan in the morning rush hours is about 25 min (in off peak hours, sometimes you can get to/from 51th street station from/to Forest Hills station in 18 to 20 minutes). If you take the E, you get off at the first stop in Manhattan which is the 51st street station and switch to the local 6 train. Baruch is three stations away.

There are quite a few decent 2BR apartments in the $1250-$1600 range. Which translate into $625 to $800 per roommate.
http://newyork.craigslist.org/search/aap/que?query=forest hills&srchType=A&minAsk=&maxAsk=&bedrooms=
 
Heh this was sort of tongue in cheek, but I do have a 2 BR for 1800 just north of LES. There's no living room but my flatmate and I don't particularly care. 20 min walking distance to NYU, 20 min walk to F train + ride up to midtown, 20 min walk to J train + ride down to Broad Street, 30 min to 200 W Street.

Actually that sounds like a very good deal though it doesn't have a living room. But I don't think people have that much time to cook regularly rite?;)
 
You should also consider the Forest Hills/Kew Gardens area (Rego Park is ok too but you would have to take a local train to the 71st station which adds to the commute time). There are two express subway trains (E and F) going to Manhattan. Travel time going into Manhattan in the morning rush hours is about 25 min (in off peak hours, sometimes you can get to/from 51th street station from/to Forest Hills station in 18 to 20 minutes). If you take the E, you get off at the first stop in Manhattan which is the 51st street station and switch to the local 6 train. Baruch is three stations away.

There are quite a few decent 2BR apartments in the $1250-$1600 range. Which translate into $625 to $800 per roommate.
http://newyork.craigslist.org/search/aap/que?query=forest hills&srchType=A&minAsk=&maxAsk=&bedrooms=

Thank you John! Living in Forest Hills area sounds like a very good choice! (low price, relatively short commute time, safe community..)
Guess now I really have to find a roommate to share the cost :)

By the way, if you take F, that would be 2 more stations to Baruch rite?
 
Thank you for the great suggestion myampol!

I did a bit research and the NYC tax is unbelievable..people living in NYC have to pay additional city tax just for living in the city?? :confused: Even for those who are living far from Manhattan, such as west of Queens they have to pay the tax?? 3% of tax can mean a couple of hundred bucks to several grands..:eek:

But however I am not very familiar with the NJ area..I only heard that around Grove Station is pretty safe. Would you mind telling me more about it? Like which place is good blah blah..and the PATH map..is it that the red line is the only train route and the others are bus routes? They don't have a very clear explanation underneath and I know it is definitely not a good idea to take the bus during rush hours..

By the way thank you SO MUCH for the NYU dorm info! It is actually a very good place to stay for a short term! (Actually I wouldn't mind living there for a whole year if they allow me to do that :) )
 
Thank you for the great suggestion myampol!

I did a bit research and the NYC tax is unbelievable..people living in NYC have to pay additional city tax just for living in the city?? :confused: Even for those who are living far from Manhattan, such as west of Queens they have to pay the tax?? 3% of tax can mean a couple of hundred bucks to several grands..:eek:

But however I am not very familiar with the NJ area..I only heard that around Grove Station is pretty safe. Would you mind telling me more about it? Like which place is good blah blah..and the PATH map..is it that the red line is the only train route and the others are bus routes? They don't have a very clear explanation underneath and I know it is definitely not a good idea to take the bus during rush hours..

By the way thank you SO MUCH for the NYU dorm info! It is actually a very good place to stay for a short term! (Actually I wouldn't mind living there for a whole year if they allow me to do that :) )

If you reside anywhere within New York City (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, Staten Island) then you have to pay the NYC resident tax, which is actually closer to 4%. The only exception would be if you come here on a diplomat (A) visa, or an international organization (G) visa (for example, if you work for the United Nations), in which case you would be exempted from ALL taxes. On a student (F) visa, you would be exempted from the social security and medicare taxes, but you would be subject to the federal, state, and (if a resident) the local income taxes once you start earning money (for example, if you are on CPT while in school or OPT after graduating.)

To work in NYC while avoiding the NYC resident tax, you would have to live either in New Jersey, Connecticut, or one of the nearby NY counties which are outside of New York City (Westchester and Rockland to the North, Nassau and Suffolk to the East). The areas of New Jersey served by the PATH train are the closest such areas to Manhattan.

The PATH system is a small train system, not unlike the NYC subway (but totally separate.) The red line runs 24hrs per day between Newark NJ and the World Trade Center. This line is not convenient to Baruch or NYU. The yellow and blue lines are convenient to both schools. During weekdays (6am - 11pm, Monday though Friday) PATH trains run separately on the yellow and blue lines (as well as on the green line). During overnight hours and on weekends, the yellow and blue lines are combined into the line shown with mixed colors on the map; the green line does not run. Baruch is located about a 10-15 minute walk from the 23rd street PATH station. The Courant Institute of NYU is located about a 10 minute walk from the 9th street PATH station.

As for apartments, the areas closest to NYC (Hoboken, Newport, and Exchange Place) can be almost as expensive as Manhattan, with many modern high-rise buildings close to the river. As you move farther west, the rent becomes lower, but the neighborhoods become a bit more dodgy.

NYU only makes its dormitories available to non-NYU students during the summer; the rest of the year they are fully occupied by NYU students.
 
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