• C++ Programming for Financial Engineering
    Highly recommended by thousands of MFE students. Covers essential C++ topics with applications to financial engineering. Learn more Join!
    Python for Finance with Intro to Data Science
    Gain practical understanding of Python to read, understand, and write professional Python code for your first day on the job. Learn more Join!
    An Intuition-Based Options Primer for FE
    Ideal for entry level positions interviews and graduate studies, specializing in options trading arbitrage and options valuation models. Learn more Join!

Next steps - financial math

Hi All,
Not sure how this will land but decided to ask the question anyway.

I am in my late 30s where I studied finance and accounting and hold a CPA designation. Over the years I have rotated across various roles from external audit, internal audit and for the past 5 years in operational risk within capital markets.

alrhough I have no intention of being a quant, I have realized that getting a good foundational knowledge of mathematical finance will help me go a long way from my current role. I have been thinking of moving into market risk and maybe see how credit risk is with the end goal of being a subject matter expert in risk management for banks and broker dealers.
However, given my non technical history/background I am contemplating on doing an online masters in financial math just to get the foundations down with the hopes of getting to try out other risk disciplines/areas outside of operational risk. However, I am concerned that it will take me forever to get all the pre-reqs down and then do a part time program which eventually will have diminishing returns both from a financial and time perspective.

would love to get feedback on what are my options given my age, experience level and career objective
 
What mathematics do you have under your belt? Be specific in terms of topics. Which math books have you studied? Give titles and authors. If you literally have no math beyond high school algebra, try Aaron Brown's "Red-Blooded Risk" for starters. But after that you will need at least some background in calculus, linear algebra, and probability.
 
I forgot to mention that I also have the PRM certification (professional risk manager). It covers cal, linear algebra, stats and probability from a risk management perspective. However, my undergrad course work in math is limited to business calculus. I feel that if I want to further advance my skill set in applied math I will need to undergrad pre-reqs and not sure how long/feasible that will be. Thoughts?
 
Top