The changing face of New York

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
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bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
It probably used to be more than international finance, before the fiscal crisis the city went through during the 70's.

At the end of WW2, New York City, with its environs, was a manufacturing hub. But the jobs steadily left, initially to the non-unionised US south, and later to Mexico. NYC's financial crisis of 1975 provided the raison d'etre for neoliberal reforms (which were later extended to the USA as a whole). NYC reinvented itself as a services hub -- finance, entertainment, restaurants, education. But entertainment and restaurant have gone down the drain and will arguably never come back. Finance can now be conducted from anywhere (and now is, with finance professionals working "from home" in different states). The NYC of old is not coming back -- no reason it should. Its time is over. The new NYC will probably be smaller in population, and poorer -- both in the aggregate and per capita.

What COVID has done is accelerate underlying trends.
 

ExSan

Well-Known Member
At the end of WW2, New York City, with its environs, was a manufacturing hub. But the jobs steadily left, initially to the non-unionised US south, and later to Mexico. NYC's financial crisis of 1975 provided the raison d'etre for neoliberal reforms (which were later extended to the USA as a whole). NYC reinvented itself as a services hub -- finance, entertainment, restaurants, education. But entertainment and restaurant have gone down the drain and will arguably never come back. Finance can now be conducted from anywhere (and now is, with finance professionals working "from home" in different states). The NYC of old is not coming back -- no reason it should. Its time is over. The new NYC will probably be smaller in population, and poorer -- both in the aggregate and per capita.

What COVID has done is accelerate underlying trends.
There were plenty of garment factories during the 70s, and 80s, today there is no one left
 

Berenger

Active Member
At the end of WW2, New York City, with its environs, was a manufacturing hub. But the jobs steadily left, initially to the non-unionised US south, and later to Mexico. NYC's financial crisis of 1975 provided the raison d'etre for neoliberal reforms (which were later extended to the USA as a whole). NYC reinvented itself as a services hub -- finance, entertainment, restaurants, education. But entertainment and restaurant have gone down the drain and will arguably never come back. Finance can now be conducted from anywhere (and now is, with finance professionals working "from home" in different states). The NYC of old is not coming back -- no reason it should. Its time is over. The new NYC will probably be smaller in population, and poorer -- both in the aggregate and per capita.

What COVID has done is accelerate underlying trends.
Nice complement to what is shown in the video, but very grim picture you paint.
Probably as soon as this plague thing will be over, the need for firms to assert centralised control over employees will lead things back to normality, "work from home" affects productivity, and firms, albeit they are now much larger and fewer than yore, still have to operate under constraint of stiff market competition.
 

Berenger

Active Member
Rhoticity


In New Jersey, Pizza Paula is a pizza parlor,
And Bostonians drop the 'r' at the slightest whim.
Rs vary much with dialects in any language, mine is written upside down phonetically, for instance.
It's vowels that in my opinion are most problematic in English: basically all reasonable pronunciations should be accepted, this authoritative guy explicitly confirms it:


In all Romance languages there is a one-to-one correspondance between a written word and its (standard) pronunciation. Vowels can be pronounced differently depending on other sounds before or after them in the context of a sentence, but also these variations are standardised (except for French where some clusters of vowels can be messy). German is like this, Greek as well, they both went through lexical reforms and standardisation to improve their regularity. I bet also slavic and scandinavian languages follow this pattern. Probably also Gaelic.
Not English, where you basically have got to know the pronunciation of every word, as looking them up on the dictionary won't help with the spelling, unless the dictionary reports phonetic spelling and you happen to know it. The written word is stuck on how pronunciation as it was in the XVII century (Rs are rolling and Us are to be pronounced as French OUs).
To improve pronunciation for new learners, adoption of some sort of runic alphabet would make more sense for English, as things are now.
Maybe just write down consonant sounds and leave vowels to be represented as fillers, as in Arabic script.
Or just adopt As and Us to give a hint as to whether the vowel sound will be from the mouth or from the throat, because right now the other vowels in the middle are confusingly representing 2 dozens different sounds.
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
In Dutch, native speakers get quite a number of curious effect when speaking and spelling both Dutch and English. Notably is pronounced as a t v like f, b like p etc.

e.g. crap salad, weed(70s slang for marijuana) becomes nederwiiet, electricity grit, cornet beef, feetback
Amsterdammers pronounce z as s and the older Amsterdammers use a smattering of Yiddish words.


// I am fluent in Dutch and I must say that "consonant confounding" is a bit jarring.
 

Berenger

Active Member
Meanwhile, on NYC's subway system:

They are legalising crime in the city by preventing the police to intervene,
so to spur well-heeled newyorkers to leave the city,
which in turn will cause loss of tax revenue and force an eventual bankrupt on repayment of municipal bonds and debt,
so that city estate assets can be bought off at a bargain,
thus allowing "them" to own the city in an even more literal sense?
The population will be reshuffled following this scenario, and will consist of indebted, easy-to-control renters.
 

Berenger

Active Member
In Dutch, native speakers get quite a number of curious effect when speaking and spelling both Dutch and English. Notably d is pronounced as a t v like f, b like p etc.

e.g. crap salad, weed(70s slang for marijuana) becomes nederwiiet, electricity grit, cornet beef, feetback
Amsterdammers pronounce z as s and the older Amsterdammers use a smattering of Yiddish words.


// I am fluent in Dutch and I must say that "consonant confounding" is a bit jarring.
Interesting. Would you spot a cline with respect to pronunciation of such sounds in other places, for instance, Rotterdam?
 

bigbadwolf

Well-Known Member
They are legalising crime in the city by preventing the police to intervene,
so to spur well-heeled newyorkers to leave the city,
which in turn will cause loss of tax revenue and force an eventual bankrupt on repayment of municipal bonds and debt,
so that city estate assets can be bought off at a bargain,
thus allowing "them" to own the city in an even more literal sense?
The population will be reshuffled following this scenario, and will consist of indebted, easy-to-control renters.

I'm sick and tired of living in the USA. I'd rather live in Sweden.
 

Berenger

Active Member
I'm sick and tired of living in the USA. I'd rather live in Sweden.
I think they also have plenty of problems over there, with rampant crime and "no-go" zones in inner cities, where the police gets attacked with war weapons.
Sadly the best places to live in across the west (Alaska, Wyoming, Arizona desert, Scandinavia towards the arctic circle) have no use for someone skilled in finance. Probably for no one with a college degree period.
 
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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Interesting. Would you spot a cline with respect to pronunciation of such sounds in other places, for instance, Rotterdam?
Yes, it changes as you go from one province to another one. Not all provinces speak standard Dutch and many have their own 'almost' languages which I cannot understand. Strangely, Afrikaans is easier to understand.
 
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