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Baruch MFE How to Improve My Chances of Getting into the MFE Program at Baruch College

Joined
3/18/23
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Are you considering pursuing a Master of Financial Engineering (MFE) degree at Baruch College? As an undergraduate student in my second year of studies at the Universidad de San Andrés in Argentina, I am already looking for ways to improve my profile and increase my chances of acceptance into the program.

The MFE program at Baruch College is known for its rigorous curriculum and high standards, and I understand the importance of building a strong profile to stand out as a competitive candidate. With this in mind, I am reaching out to the quant finance community for advice and recommendations on how to best prepare for the application process.

As I still have two years to go before I am eligible to apply, I am seeking guidance on what steps I can take in the meantime to improve my chances of acceptance. Should I pursue additional coursework in quantitative finance? Seek out internships or other work experience in the field? Or are there other activities or projects that would be particularly valuable in preparing for the MFE program?

I am open to any and all recommendations, and would be grateful for any insights or advice from those who have already been through the process. Your expertise and experiences are invaluable to me as I begin to chart my path towards pursuing the MFE degree.

If you have any thoughts or suggestions, please feel free to share them in the comments section below. I appreciate your time and look forward to hearing from you. Thank you.
 
Alright, well, I'm happy to hear you are thinking ahead. Full disclosure, I'm the same age (and school year) as you and I haven't gone through this before. However, I have been here working at it for longer than you have so let me try to pass on what I've worked out.

You gave no information that helps us know anything relevant about you, so it would help if you can start by answering the following question.

What are you studying?

-----> you will need lots of Math, stat, and CompSci to get into Baruch. Look at their website and see the entry requirements/Pre-MFE courses.
Try to get (at least):
-- Multivariable Calc,
-- Real Analysis,
-- 2 semesters of calculus based probability,
-- ODE/PDE,
-- some form of numerical methods/statistical computing, and
--both Quantnet C++ courses.

If you want help studying you can always join the discord. Right now we are quite inactive as we try to get enough people on the same level to start working.
Me and @Quasar Chunawala are trying to start up a run-through of Neftci's Mathematical Finance book, which only requires calc and calculus based probability, but communication has been spotty (I was sick for a bit and just zoned out).



You should definitely seek out internships. All this study is great, but largely useless until we learn to apply it in the real world. And there is a HUGE difference between theory and practice in Finance.

I'm of the opinion that projects aren't terribly helpful unless you really know what you're doing. All the top traders I know of say that the only way to learn is through trading and apprenticeship to an OLD accomplished trader. I'd focus on studying, meeting the pre-reqs, and trying to finagle your way into solid internship opportunities.

Furthermore, do yourself a solid and skip some of this guesswork by looking up "Baruch MFE" on LinkedIn. You will get many, many hits (I know from experience). Look at their education, internships, and general path, and then take the most immediate helpful step in that direction.
 
As Mike said, more information about your background would help make more practical suggestions.

Generally speaking, this is what would help build a strong profile:

Relevant work experience - internships in the quant space might be hard to obtain but would be very useful.

Very good understanding of the material you study in your classes. Quality over quantity.

Strong programming skills in C++ and Python.

Good luck!
 
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As Mike said, more information about your background would help make more practical suggestions.

Generally speaking, this is what would help build a strong profile:

Relevant work experience - internships in the quant space might be hard to obtain but would be very useful.

Very good understanding of the material you study in your classes. Quality over quantity.

Strong programming skills in C++ and Python.

Good luck!


Hi Dan, thanks for your response,

I am studying a Bachelor's Degree in Finance at Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina.
The degree contains several subjects with Quant content, and some more will be added soon.


1681076879000.png

In follow up with that, we know internships in the quant space might be hard to obtain.

That's why I thought of doing the CQF at the same time as the degree, in this way to have the knowledge of the sector and increase the possibilities of doing an internship in the quantum space. What would be your opinion about this plan?
 
Last edited:
Hi Dan, thanks for your response,

I am studying a Bachelor's Degree in Finance at Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina.
The degree contains several subjects with Quant content, and some more will be added soon.


View attachment 47366
In follow up with that, we know internships in the quant space might be hard to obtain.

That's why I thought of doing the CQF at the same time as the degree, in this way to have the knowledge of the sector and increase the possibilities of doing an internship in the quantum space. What would be your opinion about this plan?

I think CQF is something you would want to take after graduating from college and after having several years of work experience. Certainly not something to do concurrently with an undergraduate degree.
 
I think CQF is something you would want to take after graduating from college and after having several years of work experience. Certainly not something to do concurrently with an undergraduate degree.
 
Last edited:
Alright, well, I'm happy to hear you are thinking ahead. Full disclosure, I'm the same age (and school year) as you and I haven't gone through this before. However, I have been here working at it for longer than you have so let me try to pass on what I've worked out.

You gave no information that helps us know anything relevant about you, so it would help if you can start by answering the following question.

What are you studying?

-----> you will need lots of Math, stat, and CompSci to get into Baruch. Look at their website and see the entry requirements/Pre-MFE courses.
Try to get (at least):
-- Multivariable Calc,
-- Real Analysis,
-- 2 semesters of calculus based probability,
-- ODE/PDE,
-- some form of numerical methods/statistical computing, and
--both Quantnet C++ courses.

If you want help studying you can always join the discord. Right now we are quite inactive as we try to get enough people on the same level to start working.
Me and @Quasar Chunawala are trying to start up a run-through of Neftci's Mathematical Finance book, which only requires calc and calculus based probability, but communication has been spotty (I was sick for a bit and just zoned out).



You should definitely seek out internships. All this study is great, but largely useless until we learn to apply it in the real world. And there is a HUGE difference between theory and practice in Finance.

I'm of the opinion that projects aren't terribly helpful unless you really know what you're doing. All the top traders I know of say that the only way to learn is through trading and apprenticeship to an OLD accomplished trader. I'd focus on studying, meeting the pre-reqs, and trying to finagle your way into solid internship opportunities.

Furthermore, do yourself a solid and skip some of this guesswork by looking up "Baruch MFE" on LinkedIn. You will get many, many hits (I know from experience). Look at their education, internships, and general path, and then take the most immediate helpful step in that direction.
Can you send a fresh discord link? I'm interested
 
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