Is a PhD worth it?

Robertoreggie

New Member
So a thing to know about me, I'm super passionate about learning in general. I'm already going to college, a really good film school and I'm almost guaranteed a job right after college(given the amount of people who are able to get jobs every single year).
But, I also can't deny the only thing I don't like about this whole scenario (considering for the most part it's like a dream) is that I'm lacking in the math and science classes, and I can't explain enough my love and passion for math and science that I have. It feels like a whole in my heart that I won't be able to take as many classes in those fields as I want.
When deciding which college to go to I was extremely split. I had been spending the last 6 years making films in my free time, as well as reading science books, encyclopedias, etc. I ultimately decided as a main job I wanted to go into film, and I got into a really good film school (as said previously). But I still wanted to one day get a PhD and hopefully do research on the side, and maybe even one day teach at a university when I'm older. I didn't (and still don't) see a problem with wanting to focus on art while also having science during the times I'm not working on film.
To be clear, money isn't the reason for any of this, in fact, most likely money will be one of the issues as I'd be trying to fund it. I want to be able to do work in both fields. I guess my question to you all is, is this something o should even do? The specific fields I'm debating about are Mathematics, Mathematical physics, or Astrophysics. At the end of the day, I do want my main job to be in film, it would be mainly for my own enjoyment, and hopefully being able to work on the side and my own studies. Do any of you have advise? Am I just too naive wanting this? Idk if any of it will work, but damn I really want to try.
 

quantBaby

New Member
I think it all depends on your heart. I've seen people who are having Ph.D. for a Ph.D., they are suffering, struggling and low efficient will only make them feel depressed. I also saw people who are considering Ph.D. as an enjoyable journey, they are satisfied and happy. Accordingly, the Ph.D. drop rate in the US is about 57%, some people might drop right after they enrolled, some people might drop after 8 years of total lost. There is a guy in my neighboring lab who is doing his 16th years as a part-time phd, however, his junior just graduated in the third year with pretty impressive publications. No one can give you any useful suggestion for if you should have a Phd. As I said, please follow your heart.
Before making up your mind to join in a lab, please ask yourself:
Is this research field that I really enjoy about?
Am I getting along with the supervisor?
Am I sure about I won't feel lost when I met a hard time on a research topic? If it does make me depressed, can I adjust my mood quickly and stay positive?
Does my family support me all the time? If they are not, can I be sure about I won't get negative influence from them?

If you can't make sure about any of the questions above. Please give yourself more time before making any decision.
 

Robertoreggie

New Member
When a student comes and asks, "Should I become a mathematician?" the answer should be no. If you have to ask, you shouldn't even ask.

Paul Halmos
That's fair, I just figured since my main job will still be in film, and any form of science will be a side gig, if it was worth it to get it. At this point however, I feel much more confident About pursuing these other goals of mine. Thanks everyone who answered!
 

Robertoreggie

New Member
I think before talking about a PhD. Tell us how much maths you have taken, and then take a couple math classes above that level, THEN let's have that conversation again.
Fair enough. I shall try my best to take higher levels of math(this film school makes it hard to take advanced academic classes).
 

Robertoreggie

New Member
I think it all depends on your heart. I've seen people who are having Ph.D. for a Ph.D., they are suffering, struggling and low efficient will only make them feel depressed. I also saw people who are considering Ph.D. as an enjoyable journey, they are satisfied and happy. Accordingly, the Ph.D. drop rate in the US is about 57%, some people might drop right after they enrolled, some people might drop after 8 years of total lost. There is a guy in my neighboring lab who is doing his 16th years as a part-time phd, however, his junior just graduated in the third year with pretty impressive publications. No one can give you any useful suggestion for if you should have a Phd. As I said, please follow your heart.
Before making up your mind to join in a lab, please ask yourself:
Is this research field that I really enjoy about?
Am I getting along with the supervisor?
Am I sure about I won't feel lost when I met a hard time on a research topic? If it does make me depressed, can I adjust my mood quickly and stay positive?
Does my family support me all the time? If they are not, can I be sure about I won't get negative influence from them?

If you can't make sure about any of the questions above. Please give yourself more time before making any decision.
Also fair enough. We shall see. Thank you for your long and detailed response. I appreciate it greatly and I have and will think it over.
 
Top