Sams Teach yourself C++ (1 hr per day)

Hey, I been reading Sams Teach yourself C++ during my quantnet c++ course and it seems like really good easy introduction C++ for a beginner(with a emphasis on a engineering standpoint) and I honestly think it will be a great book to read if you are doing the C++ program.
 
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Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
What are the prerequisites? I reckon it is useful after you have learned the compiler and a bit of C.
 
What are the prerequisites? I reckon it is useful after you have learned the compiler and a bit of C.
Actually none. They teach you C syntax along the way by showing the comparison between C and C++ style of programming. You will learn C along the way.(For example C-style casting versus C++ static cast/dynamic cast/reinterpret cast/const cast).They also include the lesson of the pre-processor and teach everything with the visual studio compiler. They also teach best practices such as avoiding unecessary macros,using descriptive names, and avoiding raw pointers. The book also teaches some of the more advanced concepts such as veradic templates,move constructors and unique/weak/shared pointers as well as teaching how to define your own literals. I recommend this book alot because its user friendly and book isnt dense with random jargon that might confuse tyros.
 
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In my mind, it really depends on your studying method. At first, I thought that studying C++ in a book would be a great preparation for Quantnet C++. However, after studying for about 3 weeks, I tried the exercises in Quantnet and have no clue (the reason I reckon is that the lack of exercises in many books). I figured it is inefficient and time-consuming to follow that way. So I finally decided to dive in Quantnet course. Along the way, if I get stuck or don't understand the concepts, I google (tutorialspoint or geeksforgeeks are really helpful). Does not mean I don't agree with you. There is a reason that you are successfully complete the course in 50 days. Thanks for sharing some tips!
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Anyone can write a book. That's the easy part.

60% of my time in a book/courses is exercises A-Z.


Don't just read it; fight it! Ask your own question, look for your own examples, discover your own proofs. Is the hypothesis necessary? Is the converse true? What happens in the classical special case? What about the degenerate cases? Where does the proof use the hypothesis?​


The heart of mathematics (AND C++) consists of concrete examples and concrete problems.

Paul Halmos
 
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Anyone can write a book. That's the easy part.

60% of my time in a book/courses is exercises A-Z.


Don't just read it; fight it! Ask your own question, look for your own examples, discover your own proofs. Is the hypothesis necessary? Is the converse true? What happens in the classical special case? What about the degenerate cases? Where does the proof use the hypothesis?​


The heart of mathematics (AND C++) consists of concrete examples and concrete problems.

Paul Halmos
couldn't agree more!
 
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