Studying Quantitative Finance as a law graduate

Hi everyone,

I am a law graduate from Europe living in San Francisco, CA right now. As the world changes quickly with digitalization, I'd like to do a job that is more international than the law. I always had an interest in the Finance field and would like to pursue career in it even tho I finished a law school. I was wondering how difficult it would be to get into a master of finance or quantitative finance with my law degree. I am willing to get GRE and GMAT to show the quantitative knowledge but as far as I see the admission requirements are quite strict and they are mostly looking for the economics and engineering graduates. Would it be logical to get some kinda certification in the field to make the admission easier? I am seeking advices from you guys who have experience in this field.

Appreciate your assistance in advance.
 
Hello, I believe that you can get into a master in Finance without working too much in your curriculum, as usually, the quantitative concept in these kinds of masters in UK/US is not too advanced and quite logical (especially in UK).

However, for quantitative master you will need to do some work:
-take some coursera/udacity online courses to signal you know your basics (Linear Algebra, calculus, probability, Algorithm...), think about all the basics that an engineering/Math graduate will have.
-take GRE (Gmat is not always accepted for quantitative finance master) - you should aim for a quant score of at least the the 90th percentile for the best masters.

Happy to help you if you need more information
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
Hello, I believe that you can get into a master in Finance without working too much in your curriculum, as usually, the quantitative concept in these kinds of masters in UK/US is not too advanced and quite logical (especially in UK).

However, for quantitative master you will need to do some work:
-take some coursera/udacity online courses to signal you know your basics (Linear Algebra, calculus, probability, Algorithm...), think about all the basics that an engineering/Math graduate will have.
-take GRE (Gmat is not always accepted for quantitative finance master) - you should aim for a quant score of at least the the 90th percentile for the best masters.

Happy to help you if you need more information
remember, OP has a degree in LAW.
And the top US/UK MFE coursee are very quantitative.
I think your post is not very accurate.
 
remember, OP has a degree in LAW.
And the top US/UK MFE coursee are very quantitative.
I think your post is not very accurate.
I was more optimistic about the Finance Master courses, regarding the MFE I specified that the applicant would need to do a big work to cross all the Math/probs/Stats/programming requirements. If he gets some strong online certificate on these subjects he might get his chance.
Some people apply to MFE 10-15 years after graduating (although it is not much common).

I believe that if one shows his interest and cross all the requirements list he might get his chances.

Furthermore, I was answering the question about the certification part.
 
I was more optimistic about the Finance Master courses, regarding the MFE I specified that the applicant would need to do a big work to cross all the Math/probs/Stats/programming requirements. If he gets some strong online certificate on these subjects he might get his chance.
Some people apply to MFE 10-15 years after graduating (although it is not much common).

I believe that if one shows his interest and cross all the requirements list he might get his chances.

Furthermore, I was answering the question about the certification part.
Thank you for your response.

I will be focusing on the Finance Master more.
 

Daniel Duffy

C++ author, trainer
I wonder if studying Finance in a Community College for two years would help me with the admission to a MFE. I would be able to apply to a master’s degree thanks to my bachelor degree in law and get the requirements done with the CC degree.
I doubt it very much.
 
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