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Too late to switch focus to FE?

Hey everyone,

I'm currently a sophomore (will be a junior next fall), and am trying to make some decisions in regard to what career I want to push for. I am a CS and Statistics major with a 3.5 GPA, no finance experience (only knowledge- I've taken a bunch of online courses in my spare time). Previously, I was planning for a career as a software engineer, but have been very interested in working in finance and applying to an MFE. Is it too late to pivot?

My GPA isn't great because I never placed that much emphasis on it- I focused more on my programming skills in Python, C++, and Java. Also, not having any finance experience concerns me. Finding an internship in Finance for my junior year would be pretty difficult without any previous experience, I assume. I plan on taking QuantNet's C++ for FE to learn more about the subject as a whole and because I am interested. I would love to hear any opinions about If it's too late to switch my focus to Finance and really start worrying about my GPA so that I can gain admission to a MFE program in the future.

If it's not too late, what steps would you take to catch up with someone who has known they want to attend an MFE?

Thanks!
 
It definitely won't be too late that's for sure. As long as you have good grades in math courses (Calc I-III, ODE, Probability Theory, Lin Alg) and know how to code, then IMO exp isn't that important unless the program strictly prefers those with experience (which you can find out which ones by emailing adcom)

EDIT:
Though, having some work experience might distinguish you from other candidates. So I would defo apply for some finance internships anyways.
 
It definitely won't be too late that's for sure. As long as you have good grades in math courses (Calc I-III, ODE, Probability Theory, Lin Alg) and know how to code, then IMO exp isn't that important unless the program strictly prefers those with experience (which you can find out which ones by emailing adcom)

EDIT:
Though, having some work experience might distinguish you from other candidates. So I would defo apply for some finance internships anyways.
Thanks for the reply. This is a question that could be answered by some research, but do you know if programs expect straight As in math courses? Have all As in Calc, but got a C+ in Linear Algebra... which is pretty much my only truly bad grade in college. Any thoughts?
 
Thanks for the reply. This is a question that could be answered by some research, but do you know if programs expect straight As in math courses? Have all As in Calc, but got a C+ in Linear Algebra... which is pretty much my only truly bad grade in college. Any thoughts?
I wouldn't be able to answer with 100% certainty since I don't work in admissions, but I doubt programs require straight As due to the holistic admissions process. As an example, say you got a C+ in Lin Alg but got A in classes that require it, say, Numerical Analysis, then I think they might turn a blind eye to the C+.
 
I wouldn't be able to answer with 100% certainty since I don't work in admissions, but I doubt programs require straight As due to the holistic admissions process. As an example, say you got a C+ in Lin Alg but got A in classes that require it, say, Numerical Analysis, then I think they might turn a blind eye to the C+.
That would make sense. Hopefully, I can come back from that grade. Thanks for the help!
 
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