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Need Advice Rising Sophomore

Hi guys,
I am currently a rising sophomore with not a really good gpa. I have a dilemma which is I am taking an advanced Micro econ course required for my concentration and I would probably get a C/D grade on it.. Should i just change concentrations to double major (Math/stats) or stick with the concentration (Applied Math in Finance and Econ) Would this econ grade affect my chances in a top 10 MFE program? and what can i start doing now to increase my chances for a top 10 MFE program? (I am currently making a quantitative finance club in my school and wonder if that's gonna help my chances at all..)
Thank you
 
Start working your ass off. Live and breathe what you study and the grades will follow. Don’t aim for anything but A’s in everything you take. You’re just starting your 2nd year, you have time for your GPA to average out to something north of a 3.6. I finished my freshman year with a 2.8 cumulative GPA; I graduated with a 3.7. Major in either — so long as you’re taking all the MFE prerequisites in each — but make sure you kill it in everything you take from here on out. Good on you for kickstarting a QF club, that’s a great showing of interest and leadership, but this isn’t going to make up for bad grades. During your summers and winters read as much as you can, take notes on what you read, and do end of chapter exercises. You can get used books on Amazon for less than USD 5 (or free on libgen...). As you read more technical things on your own, classes will become less intimidating. You 100% can turn things around, but it’s going to take a lot of dedication and discipline on your part to make it happen.
 
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Start working your ass off. Live and breathe what you study and the grades will follow. Don’t aim for anything but A’s in everything you take. You’re just starting your 2nd year, you have time for your GPA to average out to something north of a 3.6. I finished my freshman year with a 2.8 cumulative GPA; I graduated with a 3.7. Major in either — so long as you’re taking all the MFE prerequisites in each — but make sure you kill it in everything you take from here on out. Good on you for kickstarting a QF club, that’s a great showing of interest and leadership, but this isn’t going to make up for bad grades. During your summers and winters read as much as you can, take notes on what you read, and do end of chapter exercises. You can get used books on Amazon for less than USD 5 (or free on libgen...). As you read more technical things on your own, classes will become less intimidating. You 100% can turn things around, but it’s going to take a lot of dedication and discipline on your part to make it happen.
Thanks for the reply. But with the economics course, does a mfe program look at non math grades too? should i change majors?
 
Tactically, if you can, it makes sense to drop the course. Strategically, you should carefully consider your path and motivations.

The concepts in micro econ are fundamental; while more quantitative than macro, the formulas are not very complex. The grade for me is a substantial red flag in any case - not for the admissions committee - but as an indicator of your own interests and motivations.

If there's a life event, then you have my sympathies. But not the admissions committee's. They won't give a shit. Consider dropping the course.

In my imagination, the priority looks something like:
GPA in Math Heavy classes > GRE Quant > Overall GPA > Essays > Letters of Recommendation > Internships > Citizenship > Clubs and organizations > GRE Verbal
 
Tactically, if you can, it makes sense to drop the course. Strategically, you should carefully consider your path and motivations.

The concepts in micro econ are fundamental; while more quantitative than macro, the formulas are not very complex. The grade for me is a substantial red flag in any case - not for the admissions committee - but as an indicator of your own interests and motivations.

If there's a life event, then you have my sympathies. But not the admissions committee's. They won't give a shit. Consider dropping the course.

In my imagination, the priority looks something like:
GPA in Math Heavy classes > GRE Quant > Overall GPA > Essays > Letters of Recommendation > Internships > Citizenship > Clubs and organizations > GRE Verbal
How about if i pass/fail the course and switch majors to math and stats? Do they view an applied math degree and a math/stat degree differently?
I was getting these bad grades because its online and I so i have been slacking of studying micro and just focused on maths
 
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How about if i pass/fail the course and switch majors to math and stats? Do they view an applied math degree and a math/stat degree differently?
I was getting these bad grades because its online and I so i have been slacking of studying micro and just focused on maths
Admissions likely won’t view math/stats and applied math very differently, what matters more I would imagine is the coursework comprising each of the degrees. Assuming they are similar, choose the one with elective coursework you get more excited about.
 
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