• C++ Programming for Financial Engineering
    Highly recommended by thousands of MFE students. Covers essential C++ topics with applications to financial engineering.
    Python for Finance with Intro to Data Science
    Gain practical understanding of Python to read, understand, and write professional Python code for your first day on the job. Coming soon.
    An Intuition-Based Options Primer for FE
    Ideal for entry level positions interviews and graduate studies, specializing in options trading arbitrage and options valuation models.

New Quantnet members say hi

Andy Nguyen

Member
Re: Brandon is in the house!

Hi Brandon,
Very nice to meet you here.
bkampsch said:
2) I participated in the Interactive Brokers Olympiad and came in 4th, winning $10,000 (a Baruch student came in 2nd, by the way)
That student is Bharath, you can read about him and the second prize on Quantnet frontpage :) http://www.quantnet.com/forum/showthread.php?t=768
bkampsch said:
I've really been enjoying my job and the R & D, which has thus far included programming Black-Scholes, the binomial method, finite differences schemes, portfolio analytics and interpolation of volatility smiles and surfaces. Very interesting stuff!
I have to agree that those are very interesting. Incidentally, this is exactly what we are studying in Prof. Stefanica's class tonight. In the first semester, we learn about finite difference, BS model, implied volatility and many others things. We do couple thousand lines of C++ code already for these problems. For the HW this week, we will build a model to price options using finite difference methods.
bkampsch said:
but still I just don't think I'd make it (that's not to say I don't think I could be successful in the program, though). Please let me know if you think otherwise...
Yes, I think otherwise :D I believe you can utilize what you already do at work and learn more interesting stuff in our program.
Just apply for 2007. I love to meet you before I graduate :)
 

DavidKDeutsch

New Member
To give yourself a quick check, use the materials in Prerequisite forums. That's all the materials we did during this summer.
I'm sorry, but I cannot find those forums. I see the ones for the regular classes, but nothing for the prerequisites. Where can I find them?

Thanks
 

pauljack

Active Member
Hi All,

I just wanted to introduce myself. I live in Atlanta. I'm currently working at a Major Power Utility as a CAD Drafter.
I've been working as a Drafter for a LONG time. I've been contemplating a career change for quite a while. I realized
2 years ago I wanted to be involved in finance. I started researching different programs. To make a long story short.
I decided I liked Financial Engineering.
I received my degree in Industrial Technology in 1989. I had to take 2 calculus courses, Statistics, and Operations
Research as well as various technical courses. I realized I had to update and expand my math and Computer skills.
I'm recently taking Calc II at Georgia State University, I plan on taking More courses, taking the GRE and
applying to the Mathematical Risk management program at Georgia State. I'm also considering Applying to Baruch for
the MFE program and maybe making a move to New York sooner than I hoped. I was planning on eventually moving back
to New York State. (I'm originally from Syracuse).
Just as an aside, Georgia State has one of the best Actuarial Science
programs in the country, and I'm suprised at the similarity of the 2 professions. The programs share some of the same
courses.
I'm 40 years old right now, I'd probably be about 45 when all this education is finished. (Oh, the wasted years and
bad decisions, sometimes I shudder) Even though I have every intention of finishing this path, because I think the math
skills are extemely transferable to other fields, How much of a disadvantage do you think my age may be?

pauljack
 

Andy Nguyen

Member
pauljack said:
Hi All,
I just wanted to introduce myself. I live in Atlanta.
Hi Paul,
Welcome to Quantnet :)
I spent some time ago in GA and heard the traffic is getting much worse now ;)
pauljack said:
How much of a disadvantage do you think my age may be?
Well, age plays no role in the admission decision. It's never too late to do something better for your life, isn't it ? I believe we have a few students in our program who are your age. Being around young, energetic classmates will make you feel much younger. Trust me :D
That said, you've been out of school for so long so I believe before applying to Baruch MFE program, taking some math, C++ and finance courses at a college near you would be the right thing to do. Of course, you have to get As for those courses.

If you have any questions, feel free to post on the Question about Baruch's MFE program forum. Anyone here can answer your inquiries.
 

pauljack

Active Member
THANKS!!

Thank You for your reply, by the way Traffic in Atlanta is awful. I first moved in this town
10 years ago, there was a 2.5 million population. now there is are 5 million people here.
the traffic congestion is compared to Los Angeles constantly. The public transportation is
very inadequate. (AH, Traffic you touched a nerve with that one).
Thanks again.

Pauljack
 

Phat Loc

Member
Hi Pauljack,

I have a BA in Actuarial Science and the MFE degree from Baruch. If you want to work in the Actuarial Field. I recommend you go to the

http://www.soa.org/ (Life and Health)

or

http://casact.org/ (Property and Casualty)

look over the exam syllabus, study and take the exams. Having worked as an actuary, passing exams is the most important thing to build a career as an actuary. This is even more important than a degree in the field. The reason is that insurance regulation require you to be an Actuary to sign off on insurance offerings.

The actuarial space can be divide into consulting and insurance companies. They both support your exam study by giving you days off to study for exams, money for books and exam fee. The trade off is that your job security is somewhat tied to your exam progress. If you can pass say the first 3 exams you should be able to get a job in the Actuarial space even without a degree in it.

As for MFE, technical knowledge is important but I can not stress enough the importance of networking in the finance industry. My best advice is for you to meet (online or in person) some of the people actually working in the field and talk with them. Even you can get in touch with people who can make the hiring decision that is even better. Getting through gate keepers is the trickest part.

Regards,

Phat
 

Jeffrey

Member
Introducing myself as well.

sorry for the errant posting on New Topic....
still getting used to this TERRIFIC forum....
feel free to delete my new topic to keep this thing clean
anyhow... here is my intro... thanks again and sorry for the mess....

Currently, and for past 2 years have been working as a portfolio analyst at T. Rowe Price in Baltimore. Prior to that, spent 3 years with institutional investment consulting firm in Phila. Focused on fixed income.
Prior to that, recd MBA in Finance from Univ of Maryland.
Very interested in the MFE progam and have been pulling together application materials, and trying to get my ducks in order so to speak.
This quantnet forum really offers an amazing insight into the program. Appreciate the privilege of getting this access to class materials and other students and to the instructors of the program. Really get a sense for the 'cadence' of the program.
Hoping I get the chance to begin working with you all in June for the Fall 2007 refresher coursework! Thanks
 

ranga27

New Member
Hi all,
I'm Sarang from Mumbai, India; working as an systems engg. with TATA Consultancy Services. My inclination towards Finance and Programming has urged me to apply for the Fall 07 program of Baruch in FE.
 

Christian

Well-Known Member
My name is Christian Lemp, and I'm currently a student at Baruch College. I'm interested in quantitative finance and have been studying several books on my own along with attending one of Professor Stefanica's classes this past Fall semester.

Outside of finance, I'm interested in travelling and languages (I've been to three countries in Southeast Asia, I want to visit all of them), eating and cooking different foods, electronic music and nightlife.

Nice to meet you all!
 

Muting

Well-Known Member
Hi,all
I am also a new applicant to Baruch MFE 2007
I really want to join the quant community because it offers scienfic methods and practical means to bring many ideas I developed from what I learnt and experienced into innovative techniques, products and even trading strategies in financial world.

My profile:
Name: Ren Muting
Undergraduate: University of International Business and Economics(quite long..), major: finance, GPA: 3.85/4, rank: 2/83
Courses: Calculus, Linear Algebra, Probability, Statistics, Differential Equation, Stochastic Process, Time-series Modeling
G/T: GRE: 1390 ( verbal: 590, quant: 800, AW: 4.5)
TOEFL: 650+5.5 (paper-based)
Research and Publication:
Risk Management in a Global View and its application in China. (coauthored), I write the part of liquidity risk.
Work Experience:
Penghua Fund Management Company Fix-income Dept, summer intern
Guotai Junan Securities Research Firm, summer intern
Bears Sterns. China
Skills: Matlab, C++, TSP, Excel (But I was strongly motivated to learn refresher courses in C++)
Hobbies: Tennis, Swimming, Chess

Hope to see you all in this summer!:)
 

Andy Nguyen

Member
Very interested in the MFE progam and have been pulling together application materials, and trying to get my ducks in order so to speak.
This quantnet forum really offers an amazing insight into the program. Appreciate the privilege of getting this access to class materials and other students and to the instructors of the program. Really get a sense for the 'cadence' of the program.
Hoping I get the chance to begin working with you all in June for the Fall 2007 refresher coursework! Thanks
Hi Jeffrey,
How are the ducks coming along ? i haven't seen you for a while. This is a good time to post admission questions since the students are in a break so we have some time to spare.
Probably it's a good thing to change your username to Jeffrey. I would highly recommend every new member to use their first name as username. It's easier for the members here and it's easier for the admission committee as well ;)
Any bit helps.
 

Uncle Max

Well-Known Member
Your profile is pretty strong.

How good are you in C++ ? You will need a lot of C++ during the program, so get ready while you have some time ;)

Good Luck!
 

Muting

Well-Known Member
Hi, maxrum
Thanks for your advice. I have passed a national certificate on C++. But I know that is not enough for FE. So I am still learning C++ this semester by myself. Fortunately, this forum gives me a lot of guide on how to learn C++.

BTW: I like the articles you posted on Finance, very interesting!:)
 

Muting

Well-Known Member
Hi, maxrum
Could you offer me some advice on preparation about C++ or other important programming skills? I am now reading a book "Thinking in C++" by Bruce Eckel, as well as reading some C++ textbooks. I hope you can recommend some useful books or articles for me.:smt100 Thanks
 

Andy Nguyen

Member
I have passed a national certificate on C++. But I know that is not enough for FE. So I am still learning C++ this semester by myself. Fortunately, this forum gives me a lot of guide on how to learn C++.
I replied to Yiping Wang's post with some programming ideas. Hopefully, it will give you some pointer on what to do in term of C++ preparation. I only took 2 semesters of regular C++ undergrad and I wish I spent more time coding. Unless you are or have been doing C++ professionally for a while, there are lot of new things to learn.
Hi, maxrum
BTW: I like the articles you posted on Finance, very interesting!:)
Indeed. That's why Max is the moderator of the Finance forum. ;)
 

Andy Nguyen

Member
Thanks, Andy. could you recommend some books in C++?
When i first learned C++ in 97, my textbook was Problem Solving with C++ by Walter Savitch.
It's a good book I always recommend to my friends who first learn C++ and they love it. But everyone will have their own fav book based on their level of C++ competency. I'm sure Max will recommend a more advanced book than mine since he is a more experienced C++ programmer than I am.

Since you already know C++, probably you should look into more advanced books like The C++ Programming Language by Bjarne Stroustrup, the inventor of C++. Other good books are C++ Primer and Effective C++
Once you know the basis well, you can pick up any financial modelling book and it's pretty easy to implement the models.

Alain and our more experienced programmers can answer almost any C++ questions. :smt023
 

Michelle

Active Member
From Michelle

Hi everyone,

My name is Michelle and I'm a prospective student in Baruch MFE program. I have been reading the info here as well as on GD forum and Baruch website. I'm very impressed with the level of friendliness and helpfulness of everyone in the Baruch MFE program. That's one of reasons I decide to join this forum and become an active member, no longer a lurker ;)

So a bit about myself. I received BS in CS and then MBA last year. I've been working for a boutique investment firm downtown since.graduation. I'd love to combine my quant skills and finance knowledge to become one who can make decision for the firm.

Aside from Baruch, I'm targetting Columbia and CMU. I look forward to becoming a part of the NYC financial engineering community.

Best,
Michelle
 
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